Tags

Type your tag names separated by a space and hit enter

In vitro activity of azithromycin, newer quinolones and cephalosporins in ciprofloxacin-resistant Salmonella causing enteric fever.
J Med Microbiol. 2007 Nov; 56(Pt 11):1490-1494.JM

Abstract

The therapeutic alternatives available for use against ciprofloxacin-resistant enteric fever isolates in an endemic area are limited. The antibiotics currently available are the quinolones, third-generation cephalosporins and conventional first-line drugs. In this study, the MICs of various newer drugs were determined for 31 ciprofloxacin-resistant enteric fever isolates (26 Salmonella enterica serovar Typhi and 5 S. enterica serovar Paratyphi A). MICs for ciprofloxacin, ofloxacin, gatifloxacin, levofloxacin, cefotaxime, cefixime, cefepime and azithromycin were determined using Etest strips and the agar dilution method. By Etest, all of the ciprofloxacin-resistant isolates had ciprofloxacin MICs >/=32 mug ml(-1). S. Typhi showed MIC(90) values of 0.50, 0.25 and 0.38 mug ml(-1) for cefixime, cefotaxime and cefepime, respectively. For the cephalosporins, a negligible difference in MIC(90) and MIC(50) values for S. Typhi and S. Paratyphi A was observed. A single isolate of S. Typhi showed a high azithromycin MIC of 64 mug ml(-1). The MIC(90) value for azithromycin in S. Typhi and S. Paratyphi was 24 mug ml(-1). Gatifloxacin demonstrated lower resistance (80.8 %) compared with the other quinolones (92-100 %) in S. Typhi. The rise in MIC levels of these antimicrobials is a matter for serious concern.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Microbiology, Vardhman Mahavir Medical College and Safdarjung Hospital, New Delhi, India.Department of Microbiology, Vardhman Mahavir Medical College and Safdarjung Hospital, New Delhi, India.Department of Microbiology, Vardhman Mahavir Medical College and Safdarjung Hospital, New Delhi, India.Department of Microbiology, Vardhman Mahavir Medical College and Safdarjung Hospital, New Delhi, India.Department of Microbiology, Vardhman Mahavir Medical College and Safdarjung Hospital, New Delhi, India.Department of Microbiology, Vardhman Mahavir Medical College and Safdarjung Hospital, New Delhi, India.Department of Microbiology, Majeedia Hospital, Hamdard University, New Delhi, India.

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

17965350

Citation

Capoor, Malini R., et al. "In Vitro Activity of Azithromycin, Newer Quinolones and Cephalosporins in Ciprofloxacin-resistant Salmonella Causing Enteric Fever." Journal of Medical Microbiology, vol. 56, no. Pt 11, 2007, pp. 1490-1494.
Capoor MR, Rawat D, Nair D, et al. In vitro activity of azithromycin, newer quinolones and cephalosporins in ciprofloxacin-resistant Salmonella causing enteric fever. J Med Microbiol. 2007;56(Pt 11):1490-1494.
Capoor, M. R., Rawat, D., Nair, D., Hasan, A. S., Deb, M., Aggarwal, P., & Pillai, P. (2007). In vitro activity of azithromycin, newer quinolones and cephalosporins in ciprofloxacin-resistant Salmonella causing enteric fever. Journal of Medical Microbiology, 56(Pt 11), 1490-1494. https://doi.org/10.1099/jmm.0.47353-0
Capoor MR, et al. In Vitro Activity of Azithromycin, Newer Quinolones and Cephalosporins in Ciprofloxacin-resistant Salmonella Causing Enteric Fever. J Med Microbiol. 2007;56(Pt 11):1490-1494. PubMed PMID: 17965350.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - In vitro activity of azithromycin, newer quinolones and cephalosporins in ciprofloxacin-resistant Salmonella causing enteric fever. AU - Capoor,Malini R, AU - Rawat,Deepti, AU - Nair,Deepthi, AU - Hasan,Azra S, AU - Deb,Monorama, AU - Aggarwal,Pushpa, AU - Pillai,Parukutty, PY - 2007/10/30/pubmed PY - 2008/1/10/medline PY - 2007/10/30/entrez SP - 1490 EP - 1494 JF - Journal of medical microbiology JO - J Med Microbiol VL - 56 IS - Pt 11 N2 - The therapeutic alternatives available for use against ciprofloxacin-resistant enteric fever isolates in an endemic area are limited. The antibiotics currently available are the quinolones, third-generation cephalosporins and conventional first-line drugs. In this study, the MICs of various newer drugs were determined for 31 ciprofloxacin-resistant enteric fever isolates (26 Salmonella enterica serovar Typhi and 5 S. enterica serovar Paratyphi A). MICs for ciprofloxacin, ofloxacin, gatifloxacin, levofloxacin, cefotaxime, cefixime, cefepime and azithromycin were determined using Etest strips and the agar dilution method. By Etest, all of the ciprofloxacin-resistant isolates had ciprofloxacin MICs >/=32 mug ml(-1). S. Typhi showed MIC(90) values of 0.50, 0.25 and 0.38 mug ml(-1) for cefixime, cefotaxime and cefepime, respectively. For the cephalosporins, a negligible difference in MIC(90) and MIC(50) values for S. Typhi and S. Paratyphi A was observed. A single isolate of S. Typhi showed a high azithromycin MIC of 64 mug ml(-1). The MIC(90) value for azithromycin in S. Typhi and S. Paratyphi was 24 mug ml(-1). Gatifloxacin demonstrated lower resistance (80.8 %) compared with the other quinolones (92-100 %) in S. Typhi. The rise in MIC levels of these antimicrobials is a matter for serious concern. SN - 0022-2615 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/17965350/In_vitro_activity_of_azithromycin_newer_quinolones_and_cephalosporins_in_ciprofloxacin_resistant_Salmonella_causing_enteric_fever_ L2 - http://jmm.microbiologyresearch.org/pubmed/content/journal/jmm/10.1099/jmm.0.47353-0 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -