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Persistent and untreated tropical infectious diseases among Sudanese refugees in the United States.
Am J Trop Med Hyg. 2007 Oct; 77(4):633-5.AJ

Abstract

A comprehensive medical evaluation to identify persistent and untreated tropical infections among members of the Sudanese group "Lost Boys of Sudan" living in Atlanta, GA, was initiated. Medical examinations and laboratory testing including blood cell counts, liver function tests, stool studies for parasites, hepatitis B serologies, and serologic testing for Schistosoma spp., Strongyloides, and filariae were performed. Preliminary results showed a high prevalence of untreated active schistosomiasis and strongyloidiasis infections in this group, 5 years after their resettlement in the United States. In addition, we found that many of them were infected with onchocerciasis and hepatitis B. We suggest that based on these preliminary results, pre-departure presumptive treatment and/or testing algorithms need to address some of these persistent tropical infections.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Medicine, Emory University School of Medicine, Atlanta, Georgia, USA. cfranco@sph.emory.eduNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

17978062

Citation

Franco-Paredes, Carlos, et al. "Persistent and Untreated Tropical Infectious Diseases Among Sudanese Refugees in the United States." The American Journal of Tropical Medicine and Hygiene, vol. 77, no. 4, 2007, pp. 633-5.
Franco-Paredes C, Dismukes R, Nicolls D, et al. Persistent and untreated tropical infectious diseases among Sudanese refugees in the United States. Am J Trop Med Hyg. 2007;77(4):633-5.
Franco-Paredes, C., Dismukes, R., Nicolls, D., Hidron, A., Workowski, K., Rodriguez-Morales, A., Wilson, M., Jones, D., Manyang, P., & Kozarsky, P. (2007). Persistent and untreated tropical infectious diseases among Sudanese refugees in the United States. The American Journal of Tropical Medicine and Hygiene, 77(4), 633-5.
Franco-Paredes C, et al. Persistent and Untreated Tropical Infectious Diseases Among Sudanese Refugees in the United States. Am J Trop Med Hyg. 2007;77(4):633-5. PubMed PMID: 17978062.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Persistent and untreated tropical infectious diseases among Sudanese refugees in the United States. AU - Franco-Paredes,Carlos, AU - Dismukes,Roberta, AU - Nicolls,Deborah, AU - Hidron,Alicia, AU - Workowski,Kimberly, AU - Rodriguez-Morales,Alfonso, AU - Wilson,Marianna, AU - Jones,Danielle, AU - Manyang,Peter, AU - Kozarsky,Phyllis, PY - 2007/11/6/pubmed PY - 2007/12/12/medline PY - 2007/11/6/entrez SP - 633 EP - 5 JF - The American journal of tropical medicine and hygiene JO - Am J Trop Med Hyg VL - 77 IS - 4 N2 - A comprehensive medical evaluation to identify persistent and untreated tropical infections among members of the Sudanese group "Lost Boys of Sudan" living in Atlanta, GA, was initiated. Medical examinations and laboratory testing including blood cell counts, liver function tests, stool studies for parasites, hepatitis B serologies, and serologic testing for Schistosoma spp., Strongyloides, and filariae were performed. Preliminary results showed a high prevalence of untreated active schistosomiasis and strongyloidiasis infections in this group, 5 years after their resettlement in the United States. In addition, we found that many of them were infected with onchocerciasis and hepatitis B. We suggest that based on these preliminary results, pre-departure presumptive treatment and/or testing algorithms need to address some of these persistent tropical infections. SN - 0002-9637 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/17978062/Persistent_and_untreated_tropical_infectious_diseases_among_Sudanese_refugees_in_the_United_States_ L2 - https://medlineplus.gov/infectiousdiseases.html DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -