Tags

Type your tag names separated by a space and hit enter

Predictors of primary medical care consultation for sleep disorders.
Sleep Med. 2008 Dec; 9(8):857-64.SM

Abstract

OBJECTIVES

To describe the prevalence and risk factors for primary care consultations for insomnia and/or snoring/sleep apnea.

METHODS

Retrospective cross-sectional, population-based postal survey of 10,000 people randomly selected from the New South Wales electoral roll; 3300 responded (35.6%). Direct contact with a random subset from the non-responders (n=100) was also undertaken with a response rate of 49%.

RESULTS

The population weighted prevalence for having insomnia was 33.0%, with 11.1% visiting a doctor. The weighted prevalence for reporting a visit to the doctor for snoring/sleep apnea was 6.2%, while 2.9% reported having visited a doctor for both disorders. The percentages of males and females consulting their doctor for either sleep disorder were similar. Independent risk factors for insomnia visits were: being older, daytime sleepiness, short sleep durations, and reduced enthusiasm. Self-medication for insomnia symptoms was common. Independent risk factors for snoring/sleep apnea visits were: being older, daytime sleepiness, short sleep durations, and reduced enthusiasm.

CONCLUSIONS

The risk factors for seeking medical help for self-suspected insomnia or snoring/sleep apnea were similar. The reported excess proportion of men being diagnosed in sleep apnea clinics appears to be related to a differential referral by clinicians. We recommend that clinicians discuss both insomnia and snoring/sleep apnea because these disorders are commonly found in patients presented with either condition.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Sleep & Circadian Research Group, Woolcock Institute of Medical Research, University of Sydney, NSW, Australia. delwynb@med.usyd.edu.auNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

17980655

Citation

Bartlett, Delwyn J., et al. "Predictors of Primary Medical Care Consultation for Sleep Disorders." Sleep Medicine, vol. 9, no. 8, 2008, pp. 857-64.
Bartlett DJ, Marshall NS, Williams A, et al. Predictors of primary medical care consultation for sleep disorders. Sleep Med. 2008;9(8):857-64.
Bartlett, D. J., Marshall, N. S., Williams, A., & Grunstein, R. R. (2008). Predictors of primary medical care consultation for sleep disorders. Sleep Medicine, 9(8), 857-64.
Bartlett DJ, et al. Predictors of Primary Medical Care Consultation for Sleep Disorders. Sleep Med. 2008;9(8):857-64. PubMed PMID: 17980655.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Predictors of primary medical care consultation for sleep disorders. AU - Bartlett,Delwyn J, AU - Marshall,Nathaniel S, AU - Williams,Anthony, AU - Grunstein,Ron R, Y1 - 2007/11/05/ PY - 2007/03/14/received PY - 2007/08/31/revised PY - 2007/09/01/accepted PY - 2007/11/6/pubmed PY - 2009/2/20/medline PY - 2007/11/6/entrez SP - 857 EP - 64 JF - Sleep medicine JO - Sleep Med VL - 9 IS - 8 N2 - OBJECTIVES: To describe the prevalence and risk factors for primary care consultations for insomnia and/or snoring/sleep apnea. METHODS: Retrospective cross-sectional, population-based postal survey of 10,000 people randomly selected from the New South Wales electoral roll; 3300 responded (35.6%). Direct contact with a random subset from the non-responders (n=100) was also undertaken with a response rate of 49%. RESULTS: The population weighted prevalence for having insomnia was 33.0%, with 11.1% visiting a doctor. The weighted prevalence for reporting a visit to the doctor for snoring/sleep apnea was 6.2%, while 2.9% reported having visited a doctor for both disorders. The percentages of males and females consulting their doctor for either sleep disorder were similar. Independent risk factors for insomnia visits were: being older, daytime sleepiness, short sleep durations, and reduced enthusiasm. Self-medication for insomnia symptoms was common. Independent risk factors for snoring/sleep apnea visits were: being older, daytime sleepiness, short sleep durations, and reduced enthusiasm. CONCLUSIONS: The risk factors for seeking medical help for self-suspected insomnia or snoring/sleep apnea were similar. The reported excess proportion of men being diagnosed in sleep apnea clinics appears to be related to a differential referral by clinicians. We recommend that clinicians discuss both insomnia and snoring/sleep apnea because these disorders are commonly found in patients presented with either condition. SN - 1389-9457 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/17980655/Predictors_of_primary_medical_care_consultation_for_sleep_disorders_ DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -