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Physician compliance with pneumococcal conjugate vaccine shortage recommendations in 2004.
J Public Health Manag Pract. 2007 Nov-Dec; 13(6):578-83.JP

Abstract

OBJECTIVE

To assess pattern of pneumococcal conjugate vaccine (PCV) administration during periods of vaccine shortage and changing recommendations.

METHODS

During 2004 PCV shortages, the Advisory Committee for Immunization Practices recommended delay of doses 3 and 4 (PCV3 and PCV4) to healthy children. A managed care health plan evaluated PCV doses administered to all enrolled children at ages 3, 5, 7, and 16 months in 2004; ICD9 codes were used to identify high-risk children.

RESULTS

Immunization coverage for the first two PCV doses remained relatively stable throughout 2004 for both high-risk and healthy children. PCV3 coverage for healthy children dropped significantly from 63 percent preshortage (February 2004) to a low of 7 percent (June 2004), then rose to preshortage levels of 2 months after recommendations were made to resume PCV3 administration. Coverage of high-risk children followed a similar pattern as that for healthy children. PCV4 coverage showed similar declines and increases following shortage-related recommendations as PCV3. Most children whose PCV3 dose may have been delayed during the shortage did receive PCV3 after the shortage.

CONCLUSIONS

Providers demonstrated rapid change in PCV administration in response to shortage-related recommendations. Little coverage difference was seen between healthy and high-risk children, possibly due to inadequate ability to determine which children truly are at high risk identified on the basis of ICD9 codes.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Health Services Research and Evaluation Branch, Immunization Services Division, National Center for Immunization and Respiratory Diseases, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), Atlanta, Georgia 30333,USA. mkolasa@cdc.govNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

17984711

Citation

Kolasa, Maureen S., et al. "Physician Compliance With Pneumococcal Conjugate Vaccine Shortage Recommendations in 2004." Journal of Public Health Management and Practice : JPHMP, vol. 13, no. 6, 2007, pp. 578-83.
Kolasa MS, Tannenbaum SM, Stevenson JM. Physician compliance with pneumococcal conjugate vaccine shortage recommendations in 2004. J Public Health Manag Pract. 2007;13(6):578-83.
Kolasa, M. S., Tannenbaum, S. M., & Stevenson, J. M. (2007). Physician compliance with pneumococcal conjugate vaccine shortage recommendations in 2004. Journal of Public Health Management and Practice : JPHMP, 13(6), 578-83.
Kolasa MS, Tannenbaum SM, Stevenson JM. Physician Compliance With Pneumococcal Conjugate Vaccine Shortage Recommendations in 2004. J Public Health Manag Pract. 2007 Nov-Dec;13(6):578-83. PubMed PMID: 17984711.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Physician compliance with pneumococcal conjugate vaccine shortage recommendations in 2004. AU - Kolasa,Maureen S, AU - Tannenbaum,Stephen M, AU - Stevenson,John M, PY - 2007/11/7/pubmed PY - 2007/12/7/medline PY - 2007/11/7/entrez SP - 578 EP - 83 JF - Journal of public health management and practice : JPHMP JO - J Public Health Manag Pract VL - 13 IS - 6 N2 - OBJECTIVE: To assess pattern of pneumococcal conjugate vaccine (PCV) administration during periods of vaccine shortage and changing recommendations. METHODS: During 2004 PCV shortages, the Advisory Committee for Immunization Practices recommended delay of doses 3 and 4 (PCV3 and PCV4) to healthy children. A managed care health plan evaluated PCV doses administered to all enrolled children at ages 3, 5, 7, and 16 months in 2004; ICD9 codes were used to identify high-risk children. RESULTS: Immunization coverage for the first two PCV doses remained relatively stable throughout 2004 for both high-risk and healthy children. PCV3 coverage for healthy children dropped significantly from 63 percent preshortage (February 2004) to a low of 7 percent (June 2004), then rose to preshortage levels of 2 months after recommendations were made to resume PCV3 administration. Coverage of high-risk children followed a similar pattern as that for healthy children. PCV4 coverage showed similar declines and increases following shortage-related recommendations as PCV3. Most children whose PCV3 dose may have been delayed during the shortage did receive PCV3 after the shortage. CONCLUSIONS: Providers demonstrated rapid change in PCV administration in response to shortage-related recommendations. Little coverage difference was seen between healthy and high-risk children, possibly due to inadequate ability to determine which children truly are at high risk identified on the basis of ICD9 codes. SN - 1078-4659 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/17984711/Physician_compliance_with_pneumococcal_conjugate_vaccine_shortage_recommendations_in_2004_ L2 - https://doi.org/10.1097/01.PHH.0000296133.62390.f3 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -