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Sentinel surveillance for travellers' diarrhoea in primary care.
BMC Infect Dis. 2007 Nov 06; 7:126.BI

Abstract

BACKGROUND

Travellers' diarrhoea is the most common health problem among international travellers and much of the burden falls on general practitioners. We assessed whether sentinel surveillance based in primary care could be used to monitor changes in the epidemiology of travellers' diarrhoea.

METHODS

A sentinel surveillance scheme of 30 volunteer general practices distributed throughout Wales provides weekly reports of consultations for eight infectious diseases to the national Communicable Disease Surveillance Centre. Travellers' diarrhoea was introduced as a new reportable infection in July 2002.

RESULTS

Between 1 July 2002 and 31 March 2005 there were 90 reports of travellers' diarrhoea. The mean annual consultation rate was 15.2 per 100,000 population (95% confidence interval: 12.2-18.7), with the highest rates in summer, in people aged 15-24 years, and in travellers to Southern Europe. A higher proportion of travellers than expected had visited destinations outside Europe and North America when compared to the proportion of all United Kingdom travellers visiting these destinations (38% vs. 11%; Chi2 = 53.3, p < 0.0001).

CONCLUSION

Sentinel surveillance has the potential to monitor secular trends in travellers' diarrhoea and to help characterise population groups or travel destinations associated with higher risk.

Authors+Show Affiliations

School of Medicine, Cardiff University, Temple of Peace and Health, Cathays Park, Cardiff, UK. gemma.northey@nphs.wales.nhs.ukNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

17986342

Citation

Northey, Gemma, et al. "Sentinel Surveillance for Travellers' Diarrhoea in Primary Care." BMC Infectious Diseases, vol. 7, 2007, p. 126.
Northey G, Evans MR, Sarvotham TS, et al. Sentinel surveillance for travellers' diarrhoea in primary care. BMC Infect Dis. 2007;7:126.
Northey, G., Evans, M. R., Sarvotham, T. S., Thomas, D. R., & Howard, T. J. (2007). Sentinel surveillance for travellers' diarrhoea in primary care. BMC Infectious Diseases, 7, 126.
Northey G, et al. Sentinel Surveillance for Travellers' Diarrhoea in Primary Care. BMC Infect Dis. 2007 Nov 6;7:126. PubMed PMID: 17986342.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Sentinel surveillance for travellers' diarrhoea in primary care. AU - Northey,Gemma, AU - Evans,Meirion R, AU - Sarvotham,Tinnu S, AU - Thomas,Daniel R, AU - Howard,Tony J, Y1 - 2007/11/06/ PY - 2007/03/13/received PY - 2007/11/06/accepted PY - 2007/11/8/pubmed PY - 2008/1/30/medline PY - 2007/11/8/entrez SP - 126 EP - 126 JF - BMC infectious diseases JO - BMC Infect. Dis. VL - 7 N2 - BACKGROUND: Travellers' diarrhoea is the most common health problem among international travellers and much of the burden falls on general practitioners. We assessed whether sentinel surveillance based in primary care could be used to monitor changes in the epidemiology of travellers' diarrhoea. METHODS: A sentinel surveillance scheme of 30 volunteer general practices distributed throughout Wales provides weekly reports of consultations for eight infectious diseases to the national Communicable Disease Surveillance Centre. Travellers' diarrhoea was introduced as a new reportable infection in July 2002. RESULTS: Between 1 July 2002 and 31 March 2005 there were 90 reports of travellers' diarrhoea. The mean annual consultation rate was 15.2 per 100,000 population (95% confidence interval: 12.2-18.7), with the highest rates in summer, in people aged 15-24 years, and in travellers to Southern Europe. A higher proportion of travellers than expected had visited destinations outside Europe and North America when compared to the proportion of all United Kingdom travellers visiting these destinations (38% vs. 11%; Chi2 = 53.3, p < 0.0001). CONCLUSION: Sentinel surveillance has the potential to monitor secular trends in travellers' diarrhoea and to help characterise population groups or travel destinations associated with higher risk. SN - 1471-2334 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/17986342/Sentinel_surveillance_for_travellers'_diarrhoea_in_primary_care_ L2 - https://bmcinfectdis.biomedcentral.com/articles/10.1186/1471-2334-7-126 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -