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Cancer incidence and mortality in relation to body mass index in the Million Women Study: cohort study.
BMJ 2007; 335(7630):1134BMJ

Abstract

OBJECTIVE

To examine the relation between body mass index (kg/m2) and cancer incidence and mortality.

DESIGN

Prospective cohort study.

PARTICIPANTS

1.2 million UK women recruited into the Million Women Study, aged 50-64 during 1996-2001, and followed up, on average, for 5.4 years for cancer incidence and 7.0 years for cancer mortality.

MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES

Relative risks of incidence and mortality for all cancers, and for 17 specific types of cancer, according to body mass index, adjusted for age, geographical region, socioeconomic status, age at first birth, parity, smoking status, alcohol intake, physical activity, years since menopause, and use of hormone replacement therapy.

RESULTS

45,037 incident cancers and 17 203 deaths from cancer occurred over the follow-up period. Increasing body mass index was associated with an increased incidence of endometrial cancer (trend in relative risk per 10 units=2.89, 95% confidence interval 2.62 to 3.18), adenocarcinoma of the oesophagus (2.38, 1.59 to 3.56), kidney cancer (1.53, 1.27 to 1.84), leukaemia (1.50, 1.23 to 1.83), multiple myeloma (1.31, 1.04 to 1.65), pancreatic cancer (1.24, 1.03 to 1.48), non-Hodgkin's lymphoma (1.17, 1.03 to 1.34), ovarian cancer (1.14, 1.03 to 1.27), all cancers combined (1.12, 1.09 to 1.14), breast cancer in postmenopausal women (1.40, 1.31 to 1.49) and colorectal cancer in premenopausal women (1.61, 1.05 to 2.48). In general, the relation between body mass index and mortality was similar to that for incidence. For colorectal cancer, malignant melanoma, breast cancer, and endometrial cancer, the effect of body mass index on risk differed significantly according to menopausal status.

CONCLUSIONS

Increasing body mass index is associated with a significant increase in the risk of cancer for 10 out of 17 specific types examined. Among postmenopausal women in the UK, 5% of all cancers (about 6000 annually) are attributable to being overweight or obese. For endometrial cancer and adenocarcinoma of the oesophagus, body mass index represents a major modifiable risk factor; about half of all cases in postmenopausal women are attributable to overweight or obesity.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Cancer Epidemiology Unit, University of Oxford, Oxford OX3 7LF. gill.reeves@ceu.ox.ac.ukNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Multicenter Study
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

17986716

Citation

Reeves, Gillian K., et al. "Cancer Incidence and Mortality in Relation to Body Mass Index in the Million Women Study: Cohort Study." BMJ (Clinical Research Ed.), vol. 335, no. 7630, 2007, p. 1134.
Reeves GK, Pirie K, Beral V, et al. Cancer incidence and mortality in relation to body mass index in the Million Women Study: cohort study. BMJ. 2007;335(7630):1134.
Reeves, G. K., Pirie, K., Beral, V., Green, J., Spencer, E., & Bull, D. (2007). Cancer incidence and mortality in relation to body mass index in the Million Women Study: cohort study. BMJ (Clinical Research Ed.), 335(7630), p. 1134.
Reeves GK, et al. Cancer Incidence and Mortality in Relation to Body Mass Index in the Million Women Study: Cohort Study. BMJ. 2007 Dec 1;335(7630):1134. PubMed PMID: 17986716.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Cancer incidence and mortality in relation to body mass index in the Million Women Study: cohort study. AU - Reeves,Gillian K, AU - Pirie,Kirstin, AU - Beral,Valerie, AU - Green,Jane, AU - Spencer,Elizabeth, AU - Bull,Diana, AU - ,, Y1 - 2007/11/06/ PY - 2007/11/8/pubmed PY - 2007/12/18/medline PY - 2007/11/8/entrez SP - 1134 EP - 1134 JF - BMJ (Clinical research ed.) JO - BMJ VL - 335 IS - 7630 N2 - OBJECTIVE: To examine the relation between body mass index (kg/m2) and cancer incidence and mortality. DESIGN: Prospective cohort study. PARTICIPANTS: 1.2 million UK women recruited into the Million Women Study, aged 50-64 during 1996-2001, and followed up, on average, for 5.4 years for cancer incidence and 7.0 years for cancer mortality. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: Relative risks of incidence and mortality for all cancers, and for 17 specific types of cancer, according to body mass index, adjusted for age, geographical region, socioeconomic status, age at first birth, parity, smoking status, alcohol intake, physical activity, years since menopause, and use of hormone replacement therapy. RESULTS: 45,037 incident cancers and 17 203 deaths from cancer occurred over the follow-up period. Increasing body mass index was associated with an increased incidence of endometrial cancer (trend in relative risk per 10 units=2.89, 95% confidence interval 2.62 to 3.18), adenocarcinoma of the oesophagus (2.38, 1.59 to 3.56), kidney cancer (1.53, 1.27 to 1.84), leukaemia (1.50, 1.23 to 1.83), multiple myeloma (1.31, 1.04 to 1.65), pancreatic cancer (1.24, 1.03 to 1.48), non-Hodgkin's lymphoma (1.17, 1.03 to 1.34), ovarian cancer (1.14, 1.03 to 1.27), all cancers combined (1.12, 1.09 to 1.14), breast cancer in postmenopausal women (1.40, 1.31 to 1.49) and colorectal cancer in premenopausal women (1.61, 1.05 to 2.48). In general, the relation between body mass index and mortality was similar to that for incidence. For colorectal cancer, malignant melanoma, breast cancer, and endometrial cancer, the effect of body mass index on risk differed significantly according to menopausal status. CONCLUSIONS: Increasing body mass index is associated with a significant increase in the risk of cancer for 10 out of 17 specific types examined. Among postmenopausal women in the UK, 5% of all cancers (about 6000 annually) are attributable to being overweight or obese. For endometrial cancer and adenocarcinoma of the oesophagus, body mass index represents a major modifiable risk factor; about half of all cases in postmenopausal women are attributable to overweight or obesity. SN - 1756-1833 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/17986716/full_citation L2 - http://www.bmj.com/cgi/pmidlookup?view=long&pmid=17986716 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -