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The influence of carbohydrate-electrolyte ingestion on soccer skill performance.
Med Sci Sports Exerc. 2007 Nov; 39(11):1969-76.MS

Abstract

PURPOSE

To investigate the effect of ingesting a carbohydrate-electrolyte solution (CHO-E), in subjects with reduced carbohydrate stores, during an intermittent shuttle running test (LIST) on soccer passing (LSPT) and shooting (LSST) performance.

METHODS

Sixteen healthy male university soccer players ingested either a 6.4% CHO-E or placebo (PLA) solution during 90 min of the LIST (5 mL x kg(-1) BM before and 2 mL x kg(-1) BM every 15 min of exercise), in a double-blind, randomized, crossover design, with each trial separated by at least 7 d. On the evening before the main trial (17:00 h), subjects performed the glycogen-reducing cycling exercise (approximately 80 min at 70% VO2max). They were then fed a low-carbohydrate evening meal and reported to the laboratory the following morning after a 10-h fast. Blood was collected at rest and after every 30 min of exercise; skill tests were performed before and after the LIST.

RESULTS

The change in mean LSST performance from pre- to post-LIST was better in the CHO-E trial (11 +/- 45 vs -16 +/- 42%; P < 0.01) but not significantly different for the LSPT performance (-1 +/- 10% (CHO-E) vs -6 +/- 13% (PLA), P = 0.13). Sprint performance during the LIST was quicker in the CHO-E trial (2.50 +/- 0.13 vs 2.53 +/- 0.13 s, P < 0.01). Plasma glucose was higher in the CHO-E trial after 90 min of exercise (5.2 +/- 0.3 vs 3.9 +/- 0.4 mM, P < 0.01).

CONCLUSIONS

Ingestion of a carbohydrate-electrolyte solution during exercise enabled subjects with compromised glycogen stores to better maintain skill and sprint performance than when ingesting fluid alone.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Institute of Food, Nutrition and Human Health, Massey University, Auckland, New Zealand. a.ali@massey.ac.nzNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Randomized Controlled Trial
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

17986904

Citation

Ali, Ajmol, et al. "The Influence of Carbohydrate-electrolyte Ingestion On Soccer Skill Performance." Medicine and Science in Sports and Exercise, vol. 39, no. 11, 2007, pp. 1969-76.
Ali A, Williams C, Nicholas CW, et al. The influence of carbohydrate-electrolyte ingestion on soccer skill performance. Med Sci Sports Exerc. 2007;39(11):1969-76.
Ali, A., Williams, C., Nicholas, C. W., & Foskett, A. (2007). The influence of carbohydrate-electrolyte ingestion on soccer skill performance. Medicine and Science in Sports and Exercise, 39(11), 1969-76.
Ali A, et al. The Influence of Carbohydrate-electrolyte Ingestion On Soccer Skill Performance. Med Sci Sports Exerc. 2007;39(11):1969-76. PubMed PMID: 17986904.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - The influence of carbohydrate-electrolyte ingestion on soccer skill performance. AU - Ali,Ajmol, AU - Williams,Clyde, AU - Nicholas,Ceri W, AU - Foskett,Andrew, PY - 2007/11/8/pubmed PY - 2008/2/15/medline PY - 2007/11/8/entrez SP - 1969 EP - 76 JF - Medicine and science in sports and exercise JO - Med Sci Sports Exerc VL - 39 IS - 11 N2 - PURPOSE: To investigate the effect of ingesting a carbohydrate-electrolyte solution (CHO-E), in subjects with reduced carbohydrate stores, during an intermittent shuttle running test (LIST) on soccer passing (LSPT) and shooting (LSST) performance. METHODS: Sixteen healthy male university soccer players ingested either a 6.4% CHO-E or placebo (PLA) solution during 90 min of the LIST (5 mL x kg(-1) BM before and 2 mL x kg(-1) BM every 15 min of exercise), in a double-blind, randomized, crossover design, with each trial separated by at least 7 d. On the evening before the main trial (17:00 h), subjects performed the glycogen-reducing cycling exercise (approximately 80 min at 70% VO2max). They were then fed a low-carbohydrate evening meal and reported to the laboratory the following morning after a 10-h fast. Blood was collected at rest and after every 30 min of exercise; skill tests were performed before and after the LIST. RESULTS: The change in mean LSST performance from pre- to post-LIST was better in the CHO-E trial (11 +/- 45 vs -16 +/- 42%; P < 0.01) but not significantly different for the LSPT performance (-1 +/- 10% (CHO-E) vs -6 +/- 13% (PLA), P = 0.13). Sprint performance during the LIST was quicker in the CHO-E trial (2.50 +/- 0.13 vs 2.53 +/- 0.13 s, P < 0.01). Plasma glucose was higher in the CHO-E trial after 90 min of exercise (5.2 +/- 0.3 vs 3.9 +/- 0.4 mM, P < 0.01). CONCLUSIONS: Ingestion of a carbohydrate-electrolyte solution during exercise enabled subjects with compromised glycogen stores to better maintain skill and sprint performance than when ingesting fluid alone. SN - 0195-9131 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/17986904/The_influence_of_carbohydrate_electrolyte_ingestion_on_soccer_skill_performance_ L2 - http://dx.doi.org/10.1249/mss.0b013e31814fb3e3 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -