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[Erysipelas today].
Med Pregl 2007 May-Jun; 60(5-6):282-6MP

Abstract

INTRODUCTION

Erysipelas is a form of cellulitis and a bacterial infection affecting the most superficial layers of the skin which is caused by group A--hemolytic Streptococcus. The symptoms of erysipelas usually arise quite suddenly and they are often accompanied by fever, chill and shivering. The affected skin is distinguished from other forms of cellulitis by well-defined, raised edge. The affected skin is red, swollen and may be finely dimpled (like an orange skin). TREATMENT OF ERYSIPELAS: Uncomplicated erysipelas can be treated on an outpatient basis. Indications for hospitalization include a severe clinical picture and socioeconomics factors. Most patients suffering from erysipelas in Belgrade are treated at the Institute of Infectious and Tropical Diseases, and the aim of this study was to analyze patients treated during 2002 and 2003, in order to determine characteristics of erysipelas at the beginning of the XXI century.

MATERIAL AND METHODS

During the studied period, we treated 60 patients (26.7%) of all registrated erysipelas cases in Belgrade. The male/female ratio was 1:1.6.

DISCUSSION AND CONCLUSION

Prevalence was higher during the summer months. In most cases, the severity and the need for hospitalization were recognized at the beginning; therefore, 74% of patients were hospitalized during the first five days from the onset of nonspecific signs of illness. Laboratory tests showed mild leukocytosis (med 12.05 x 10/9/l), with predominant neutrophils (74.8%) and increased fibrinogen (med 5.4 g/l). Predisposing factors were present in 83.3% of cases; of them, in 35% of cases this was not the first episode of this illness. In 85% of cases erysipelas of the leg was established, and it was the most frequent localization of all.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Klinicki centar Srbije, Beograd. elika@eunet.yu

Pub Type(s)

English Abstract
Journal Article

Language

srp

PubMed ID

17988064

Citation

Gvozdenović, Eleonora, and Olga Dulović. "[Erysipelas Today]." Medicinski Pregled, vol. 60, no. 5-6, 2007, pp. 282-6.
Gvozdenović E, Dulović O. [Erysipelas today]. Med Pregl. 2007;60(5-6):282-6.
Gvozdenović, E., & Dulović, O. (2007). [Erysipelas today]. Medicinski Pregled, 60(5-6), pp. 282-6.
Gvozdenović E, Dulović O. [Erysipelas Today]. Med Pregl. 2007;60(5-6):282-6. PubMed PMID: 17988064.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - [Erysipelas today]. AU - Gvozdenović,Eleonora, AU - Dulović,Olga, PY - 2007/11/9/pubmed PY - 2008/2/6/medline PY - 2007/11/9/entrez SP - 282 EP - 6 JF - Medicinski pregled JO - Med. Pregl. VL - 60 IS - 5-6 N2 - INTRODUCTION: Erysipelas is a form of cellulitis and a bacterial infection affecting the most superficial layers of the skin which is caused by group A--hemolytic Streptococcus. The symptoms of erysipelas usually arise quite suddenly and they are often accompanied by fever, chill and shivering. The affected skin is distinguished from other forms of cellulitis by well-defined, raised edge. The affected skin is red, swollen and may be finely dimpled (like an orange skin). TREATMENT OF ERYSIPELAS: Uncomplicated erysipelas can be treated on an outpatient basis. Indications for hospitalization include a severe clinical picture and socioeconomics factors. Most patients suffering from erysipelas in Belgrade are treated at the Institute of Infectious and Tropical Diseases, and the aim of this study was to analyze patients treated during 2002 and 2003, in order to determine characteristics of erysipelas at the beginning of the XXI century. MATERIAL AND METHODS: During the studied period, we treated 60 patients (26.7%) of all registrated erysipelas cases in Belgrade. The male/female ratio was 1:1.6. DISCUSSION AND CONCLUSION: Prevalence was higher during the summer months. In most cases, the severity and the need for hospitalization were recognized at the beginning; therefore, 74% of patients were hospitalized during the first five days from the onset of nonspecific signs of illness. Laboratory tests showed mild leukocytosis (med 12.05 x 10/9/l), with predominant neutrophils (74.8%) and increased fibrinogen (med 5.4 g/l). Predisposing factors were present in 83.3% of cases; of them, in 35% of cases this was not the first episode of this illness. In 85% of cases erysipelas of the leg was established, and it was the most frequent localization of all. SN - 0025-8105 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/17988064/[Erysipelas_today]_ L2 - http://www.diseaseinfosearch.org/result/2632 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -