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The dyadic nature of bullying and victimization: testing a dual-perspective theory.
Child Dev. 2007 Nov-Dec; 78(6):1843-54.CD

Abstract

For this study, information on Who Bullies Who was collected from 54 school classes with 918 children (M age = 11) and 13,606 dyadic relations. Bullying and victimization were viewed separately from the point of view of the bully and the victim. The two perspectives were highly complementary. The probability of a bully-victim relationship was higher if the bully was more dominant than the victim, and if the victim was more vulnerable than the bully and more rejected by the class. In a bully-victim dyad, boys were more often the bullies. There was no finding of sex effect for victimization. Liking reduced and disliking increased the probability of a bully-victim relationship.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Interuniversity Center for Social Science Theory and Methodology, University of Groningen, Grote Rozenstraat 31, 9712 TG Groningen, the Netherlands. d.r.veenstra@rug.nlNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

17988325

Citation

Veenstra, René, et al. "The Dyadic Nature of Bullying and Victimization: Testing a Dual-perspective Theory." Child Development, vol. 78, no. 6, 2007, pp. 1843-54.
Veenstra R, Lindenberg S, Zijlstra BJ, et al. The dyadic nature of bullying and victimization: testing a dual-perspective theory. Child Dev. 2007;78(6):1843-54.
Veenstra, R., Lindenberg, S., Zijlstra, B. J., De Winter, A. F., Verhulst, F. C., & Ormel, J. (2007). The dyadic nature of bullying and victimization: testing a dual-perspective theory. Child Development, 78(6), 1843-54.
Veenstra R, et al. The Dyadic Nature of Bullying and Victimization: Testing a Dual-perspective Theory. Child Dev. 2007 Nov-Dec;78(6):1843-54. PubMed PMID: 17988325.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - The dyadic nature of bullying and victimization: testing a dual-perspective theory. AU - Veenstra,René, AU - Lindenberg,Siegwart, AU - Zijlstra,Bonne J H, AU - De Winter,Andrea F, AU - Verhulst,Frank C, AU - Ormel,Johan, PY - 2007/11/9/pubmed PY - 2008/2/7/medline PY - 2007/11/9/entrez SP - 1843 EP - 54 JF - Child development JO - Child Dev VL - 78 IS - 6 N2 - For this study, information on Who Bullies Who was collected from 54 school classes with 918 children (M age = 11) and 13,606 dyadic relations. Bullying and victimization were viewed separately from the point of view of the bully and the victim. The two perspectives were highly complementary. The probability of a bully-victim relationship was higher if the bully was more dominant than the victim, and if the victim was more vulnerable than the bully and more rejected by the class. In a bully-victim dyad, boys were more often the bullies. There was no finding of sex effect for victimization. Liking reduced and disliking increased the probability of a bully-victim relationship. SN - 0009-3920 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/17988325/The_dyadic_nature_of_bullying_and_victimization:_testing_a_dual_perspective_theory_ L2 - https://doi.org/10.1111/j.1467-8624.2007.01102.x DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -