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Depression, posttraumatic stress disorder, and mortality.
Psychosom Med. 2008 Jan; 70(1):20-6.PM

Abstract

OBJECTIVE

To determine whether a history of depression and/or posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) is associated with all-cause mortality in primary care patients over an average of 2 years.

METHODS

Patients from seven Department of Veterans Affairs medical centers completed mailed questionnaires. Depression and PTSD status were determined from patient self-report of a prior diagnosis and/or electronic administrative data. Date of death was ascertained from Veterans Health Information Systems and Technology Architecture and the Department of Veterans Affairs' Beneficiary Identification and Records Locator System.

RESULTS

Among 35,715 primary care patients, those with a history of depression without a history of PTSD (n = 6876) were at increased risk of death over an average of 2 years compared with patients with neither depression nor PTSD after adjustment for demographic variables, health behaviors, and medical comorbidity (hazard ratio (HR) = 1.17; 95% Confidence Interval (CI) = 1.06-1.28). However, patients with a history of PTSD without a history of depression (n = 748) were not at increased risk of death compared with patients with neither depression nor PTSD (HR = 0.84; 95% CI = 0.63-1.13). Patients with a history of both (n = 3762) were at increased risk of death after adjustment for demographic factors, although not after additional adjustment for health behaviors and medical comorbidity (HR = 0.90; 95% CI = 0.78-1.04).

CONCLUSIONS

In a large sample of veterans, a prior diagnosis of depression, but not PTSD, was associated with an increased risk of death over an average of 2 years after adjusting for age, demographic variables, health behaviors, and medical comorbidity.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Health Services Research and Development, Veterans Affairs Puget Sound Health Care System, Seattle, Washington, USA. lskinder@stanfordalumni.orgNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, U.S. Gov't, Non-P.H.S.

Language

eng

PubMed ID

17991816

Citation

Kinder, Leslie S., et al. "Depression, Posttraumatic Stress Disorder, and Mortality." Psychosomatic Medicine, vol. 70, no. 1, 2008, pp. 20-6.
Kinder LS, Bradley KA, Katon WJ, et al. Depression, posttraumatic stress disorder, and mortality. Psychosom Med. 2008;70(1):20-6.
Kinder, L. S., Bradley, K. A., Katon, W. J., Ludman, E., McDonell, M. B., & Bryson, C. L. (2008). Depression, posttraumatic stress disorder, and mortality. Psychosomatic Medicine, 70(1), 20-6.
Kinder LS, et al. Depression, Posttraumatic Stress Disorder, and Mortality. Psychosom Med. 2008;70(1):20-6. PubMed PMID: 17991816.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Depression, posttraumatic stress disorder, and mortality. AU - Kinder,Leslie S, AU - Bradley,Katharine A, AU - Katon,Wayne J, AU - Ludman,Evette, AU - McDonell,Mary B, AU - Bryson,Chris L, Y1 - 2007/11/08/ PY - 2007/11/10/pubmed PY - 2008/6/5/medline PY - 2007/11/10/entrez SP - 20 EP - 6 JF - Psychosomatic medicine JO - Psychosom Med VL - 70 IS - 1 N2 - OBJECTIVE: To determine whether a history of depression and/or posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) is associated with all-cause mortality in primary care patients over an average of 2 years. METHODS: Patients from seven Department of Veterans Affairs medical centers completed mailed questionnaires. Depression and PTSD status were determined from patient self-report of a prior diagnosis and/or electronic administrative data. Date of death was ascertained from Veterans Health Information Systems and Technology Architecture and the Department of Veterans Affairs' Beneficiary Identification and Records Locator System. RESULTS: Among 35,715 primary care patients, those with a history of depression without a history of PTSD (n = 6876) were at increased risk of death over an average of 2 years compared with patients with neither depression nor PTSD after adjustment for demographic variables, health behaviors, and medical comorbidity (hazard ratio (HR) = 1.17; 95% Confidence Interval (CI) = 1.06-1.28). However, patients with a history of PTSD without a history of depression (n = 748) were not at increased risk of death compared with patients with neither depression nor PTSD (HR = 0.84; 95% CI = 0.63-1.13). Patients with a history of both (n = 3762) were at increased risk of death after adjustment for demographic factors, although not after additional adjustment for health behaviors and medical comorbidity (HR = 0.90; 95% CI = 0.78-1.04). CONCLUSIONS: In a large sample of veterans, a prior diagnosis of depression, but not PTSD, was associated with an increased risk of death over an average of 2 years after adjusting for age, demographic variables, health behaviors, and medical comorbidity. SN - 1534-7796 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/17991816/Depression_posttraumatic_stress_disorder_and_mortality_ DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -