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The effect of cannabidiol and URB597 on conditioned gaping (a model of nausea) elicited by a lithium-paired context in the rat.
Psychopharmacology (Berl). 2008 Feb; 196(3):389-95.P

Abstract

RATIONALE

Anticipatory nausea (AN) experienced by chemotherapy patients is resistant to current anti-nausea treatments. In this study, the effect of manipulation of the endocannabinoid (EC) system on a rat model of nausea (conditioned gaping) was determined.

OBJECTIVE

The potential of cannabidiol (CBD) and the fatty acid amide hydrolase (FAAH) inhibitor, URB597 (URB) to reduce conditioned gaping in rats were evaluated.

MATERIALS AND METHODS

In each experiment, rats received four conditioning trials in which they were injected with lithium chloride immediately before placement in a distinctive odor-laced context. During testing, in experiment 1, rats were injected with vehicle (VEH), 1, 5 or 10 mg/kg CBD 30 min before placement in the context previously paired with nausea and in experiment 2, rats were injected with VEH, 0.1 or 0.3 mg/kg URB 2 h before placement in the context. Additional groups evaluated the ability of the CB(1) antagonist/inverse agonist, SR141716A, to reverse the suppressive effects of URB. Experiment 3 measured the potential of URB to interfere with the establishment of conditioned gaping.

RESULTS

When administered before testing, CBD (1 and 5, but not 10 mg/kg) and URB (0.3, but not 0.1 mg/kg) suppressed conditioned gaping. The effect of URB was reversed by pre-treatment with the CB(1) antagonist/inverse agonist, SR141716A. When administered before conditioning, URB also interfered with the establishment of conditioned gaping.

CONCLUSIONS

Manipulations of the EC system may have therapeutic potential in the treatment of AN.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Psychology, University of Guelph, Guelph, ON, Canada.No affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

17992520

Citation

Rock, Erin M., et al. "The Effect of Cannabidiol and URB597 On Conditioned Gaping (a Model of Nausea) Elicited By a Lithium-paired Context in the Rat." Psychopharmacology, vol. 196, no. 3, 2008, pp. 389-95.
Rock EM, Limebeer CL, Mechoulam R, et al. The effect of cannabidiol and URB597 on conditioned gaping (a model of nausea) elicited by a lithium-paired context in the rat. Psychopharmacology (Berl). 2008;196(3):389-95.
Rock, E. M., Limebeer, C. L., Mechoulam, R., Piomelli, D., & Parker, L. A. (2008). The effect of cannabidiol and URB597 on conditioned gaping (a model of nausea) elicited by a lithium-paired context in the rat. Psychopharmacology, 196(3), 389-95.
Rock EM, et al. The Effect of Cannabidiol and URB597 On Conditioned Gaping (a Model of Nausea) Elicited By a Lithium-paired Context in the Rat. Psychopharmacology (Berl). 2008;196(3):389-95. PubMed PMID: 17992520.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - The effect of cannabidiol and URB597 on conditioned gaping (a model of nausea) elicited by a lithium-paired context in the rat. AU - Rock,Erin M, AU - Limebeer,Cheryl L, AU - Mechoulam,Raphael, AU - Piomelli,Daniele, AU - Parker,Linda A, Y1 - 2007/11/09/ PY - 2007/07/23/received PY - 2007/09/26/accepted PY - 2007/11/10/pubmed PY - 2008/5/31/medline PY - 2007/11/10/entrez SP - 389 EP - 95 JF - Psychopharmacology JO - Psychopharmacology (Berl) VL - 196 IS - 3 N2 - RATIONALE: Anticipatory nausea (AN) experienced by chemotherapy patients is resistant to current anti-nausea treatments. In this study, the effect of manipulation of the endocannabinoid (EC) system on a rat model of nausea (conditioned gaping) was determined. OBJECTIVE: The potential of cannabidiol (CBD) and the fatty acid amide hydrolase (FAAH) inhibitor, URB597 (URB) to reduce conditioned gaping in rats were evaluated. MATERIALS AND METHODS: In each experiment, rats received four conditioning trials in which they were injected with lithium chloride immediately before placement in a distinctive odor-laced context. During testing, in experiment 1, rats were injected with vehicle (VEH), 1, 5 or 10 mg/kg CBD 30 min before placement in the context previously paired with nausea and in experiment 2, rats were injected with VEH, 0.1 or 0.3 mg/kg URB 2 h before placement in the context. Additional groups evaluated the ability of the CB(1) antagonist/inverse agonist, SR141716A, to reverse the suppressive effects of URB. Experiment 3 measured the potential of URB to interfere with the establishment of conditioned gaping. RESULTS: When administered before testing, CBD (1 and 5, but not 10 mg/kg) and URB (0.3, but not 0.1 mg/kg) suppressed conditioned gaping. The effect of URB was reversed by pre-treatment with the CB(1) antagonist/inverse agonist, SR141716A. When administered before conditioning, URB also interfered with the establishment of conditioned gaping. CONCLUSIONS: Manipulations of the EC system may have therapeutic potential in the treatment of AN. SN - 0033-3158 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/17992520/The_effect_of_cannabidiol_and_URB597_on_conditioned_gaping__a_model_of_nausea__elicited_by_a_lithium_paired_context_in_the_rat_ L2 - https://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s00213-007-0970-1 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -