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Contact lens-related Fusarium infection: case series experience in New York City and review of fungal keratitis.
Eye Contact Lens 2007; 33(6 Pt 1):322-8EC

Abstract

PURPOSE

To report and define the clinical presentation, hygienic practices, treatment regimens, and visual sequelae of contact lens wearers infected with Fusarium keratitis in the New York City metropolitan area and to review the literature on Fusarium keratitis.

METHODS

A retrospective chart review was conducted on three patients diagnosed with Fusarium keratitis by corneal fungal culture in the New York City metropolitan area from October 2005 to February 2006. None of the patients had a history of recent ocular trauma before infection.

RESULTS

All three patients used disposable soft contact lenses and ReNu with MoistureLoc 1 month before infection. All patients experienced a unilateral stabbing pain of the affected eye after removal of the contact lens. Patients had corneal ulcers ranging from 1 to 5 mm in diameter and were all initially treated with topical antibiotics and steroids for a period between 7 and 52 days. Antifungal treatment was eventually prescribed to all patients, with topical natamycin 5% every hour being the most common. One patient required corneal transplantation, and the other two patients recovered visual acuity comparable to their baseline acuity.

CONCLUSIONS

A delay in diagnosis and prolonged treatment delay of Fusarium keratitis is associated with significant comorbidity. Physicians must have a higher index of suspicion for fungal keratitis in contact lens wearers to facilitate in early diagnosis and treatment.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Ophthalmology, Mount Sinai School of Medicine, 1190 Fifth Avenue, New York, NY 10029, USA.No affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Review

Language

eng

PubMed ID

17993829

Citation

Hu, Sandra, et al. "Contact Lens-related Fusarium Infection: Case Series Experience in New York City and Review of Fungal Keratitis." Eye & Contact Lens, vol. 33, no. 6 Pt 1, 2007, pp. 322-8.
Hu S, Fan VC, Koonapareddy C, et al. Contact lens-related Fusarium infection: case series experience in New York City and review of fungal keratitis. Eye Contact Lens. 2007;33(6 Pt 1):322-8.
Hu, S., Fan, V. C., Koonapareddy, C., Du, T. T., & Asbell, P. A. (2007). Contact lens-related Fusarium infection: case series experience in New York City and review of fungal keratitis. Eye & Contact Lens, 33(6 Pt 1), pp. 322-8.
Hu S, et al. Contact Lens-related Fusarium Infection: Case Series Experience in New York City and Review of Fungal Keratitis. Eye Contact Lens. 2007;33(6 Pt 1):322-8. PubMed PMID: 17993829.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Contact lens-related Fusarium infection: case series experience in New York City and review of fungal keratitis. AU - Hu,Sandra, AU - Fan,Vincent C, AU - Koonapareddy,Chakravarthy, AU - Du,Ted T, AU - Asbell,Penny A, PY - 2007/11/13/pubmed PY - 2008/1/9/medline PY - 2007/11/13/entrez SP - 322 EP - 8 JF - Eye & contact lens JO - Eye Contact Lens VL - 33 IS - 6 Pt 1 N2 - PURPOSE: To report and define the clinical presentation, hygienic practices, treatment regimens, and visual sequelae of contact lens wearers infected with Fusarium keratitis in the New York City metropolitan area and to review the literature on Fusarium keratitis. METHODS: A retrospective chart review was conducted on three patients diagnosed with Fusarium keratitis by corneal fungal culture in the New York City metropolitan area from October 2005 to February 2006. None of the patients had a history of recent ocular trauma before infection. RESULTS: All three patients used disposable soft contact lenses and ReNu with MoistureLoc 1 month before infection. All patients experienced a unilateral stabbing pain of the affected eye after removal of the contact lens. Patients had corneal ulcers ranging from 1 to 5 mm in diameter and were all initially treated with topical antibiotics and steroids for a period between 7 and 52 days. Antifungal treatment was eventually prescribed to all patients, with topical natamycin 5% every hour being the most common. One patient required corneal transplantation, and the other two patients recovered visual acuity comparable to their baseline acuity. CONCLUSIONS: A delay in diagnosis and prolonged treatment delay of Fusarium keratitis is associated with significant comorbidity. Physicians must have a higher index of suspicion for fungal keratitis in contact lens wearers to facilitate in early diagnosis and treatment. SN - 1542-2321 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/17993829/Contact_lens_related_Fusarium_infection:_case_series_experience_in_New_York_City_and_review_of_fungal_keratitis_ L2 - http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/ICL.0b013e3180645d17 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -