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Influence of chronotype, season, and sex of subject on sleep behavior of young adults.
Chronobiol Int. 2007; 24(5):875-88.CI

Abstract

The aim of this study was to investigate whether sex, season, and/or chronotype influence the sleep behavior of university students. Detailed data were collected on activity/rest patterns by wrist actigraphy combined with diaries. Thirty-four medical students (19 female and 15 male) were monitored by Actiwatch actometers for 15 consecutive days in May and again in November. The data of a modified Horne and Ostberg chronotype questionnaire, which were collected from 1573 female and 1124 male medical school students surveyed in the spring and autumn over an eight-year period, were evaluated. Actiwatch sleep analysis software was used to process the activity data with statistical analyses performed with ANOVA. We found no significant sex-specific differences in sleep efficiency, sleep onset latency, or actual sleep-time duration. However, we did find a difference in sleep efficiency between morning and evening types, with morning types having a higher sleep efficiency (87.9%, SD=1.3) than evening types (84.3%, SD=0.87%; p=0.007). Seasonal differences were also detected: the actual sleep-time duration in autumn was significantly longer (mean 6.9 h, SD=0.13 h) than in spring (6.6 h, SD=0.1 h; p=0.013). Evaluation of the chronotype questionnaire data showed that individuals with no special preference for morningness or eveningness (i.e., so-called intermediates) were most common. The distribution of chronotypes was related to the sex of subject. Men displayed eveningness significantly more often than women (28.9% males vs. 20.8% females; p<0.001), while females exhibited greater morningness (20.3% females vs.15.6% males; p<0.001). Sex influences chronotype distribution, but not actual sleep time-duration, sleep onset latency, or sleep efficiency. The latter, however, differed among chronotypes, while actual sleep-time duration was affected by season.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Research Group Chronobiology and Behavior, CC1, Charité - Universitätsmedizin Berlin, Berlin, Germany. hanna.lehnkering@charite.deNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

17994343

Citation

Lehnkering, Hanna, and Renate Siegmund. "Influence of Chronotype, Season, and Sex of Subject On Sleep Behavior of Young Adults." Chronobiology International, vol. 24, no. 5, 2007, pp. 875-88.
Lehnkering H, Siegmund R. Influence of chronotype, season, and sex of subject on sleep behavior of young adults. Chronobiol Int. 2007;24(5):875-88.
Lehnkering, H., & Siegmund, R. (2007). Influence of chronotype, season, and sex of subject on sleep behavior of young adults. Chronobiology International, 24(5), 875-88.
Lehnkering H, Siegmund R. Influence of Chronotype, Season, and Sex of Subject On Sleep Behavior of Young Adults. Chronobiol Int. 2007;24(5):875-88. PubMed PMID: 17994343.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Influence of chronotype, season, and sex of subject on sleep behavior of young adults. AU - Lehnkering,Hanna, AU - Siegmund,Renate, PY - 2007/11/13/pubmed PY - 2007/12/7/medline PY - 2007/11/13/entrez SP - 875 EP - 88 JF - Chronobiology international JO - Chronobiol Int VL - 24 IS - 5 N2 - The aim of this study was to investigate whether sex, season, and/or chronotype influence the sleep behavior of university students. Detailed data were collected on activity/rest patterns by wrist actigraphy combined with diaries. Thirty-four medical students (19 female and 15 male) were monitored by Actiwatch actometers for 15 consecutive days in May and again in November. The data of a modified Horne and Ostberg chronotype questionnaire, which were collected from 1573 female and 1124 male medical school students surveyed in the spring and autumn over an eight-year period, were evaluated. Actiwatch sleep analysis software was used to process the activity data with statistical analyses performed with ANOVA. We found no significant sex-specific differences in sleep efficiency, sleep onset latency, or actual sleep-time duration. However, we did find a difference in sleep efficiency between morning and evening types, with morning types having a higher sleep efficiency (87.9%, SD=1.3) than evening types (84.3%, SD=0.87%; p=0.007). Seasonal differences were also detected: the actual sleep-time duration in autumn was significantly longer (mean 6.9 h, SD=0.13 h) than in spring (6.6 h, SD=0.1 h; p=0.013). Evaluation of the chronotype questionnaire data showed that individuals with no special preference for morningness or eveningness (i.e., so-called intermediates) were most common. The distribution of chronotypes was related to the sex of subject. Men displayed eveningness significantly more often than women (28.9% males vs. 20.8% females; p<0.001), while females exhibited greater morningness (20.3% females vs.15.6% males; p<0.001). Sex influences chronotype distribution, but not actual sleep time-duration, sleep onset latency, or sleep efficiency. The latter, however, differed among chronotypes, while actual sleep-time duration was affected by season. SN - 0742-0528 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/17994343/Influence_of_chronotype_season_and_sex_of_subject_on_sleep_behavior_of_young_adults_ DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -