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Treatment of tardive dyskinesia with levetiracetam in a transplant patient.
Acta Neurol Scand 2008; 117(5):351-3AN

Abstract

OBJECTIVE

To describe successful treatment of tardive dyskinesia with levetiracetam.

BACKGROUND

Tardive dyskinesia is a late-onset movement disorder caused by exposure to dopamine receptor blocking agents, most commonly neuroleptics. Metoclopramide is frequently used to treat gastrointestinal dysmotility. It has antidopaminergic properties, and is estimated to be responsible for two-thirds of drug-related movement disorders.

DESIGN/METHODS

Case report.

RESULTS

A 68-year-old woman presented with a history of intestinal transplantation (12 years ago; short gut syndrome related to bowel resection for rectal carcinoma) and renal transplantation (1 year ago; diabetes). She developed involuntary movements with stereotypic oro-buccal-lingual dyskinesias and right-sided choreiform movements. Her Abnormal Involuntary Movement Scale score (AIMS) score was 27. She has been treated with metoclopramide for gastrointestinal dysmotility for more than 10 years and was diagnosed with tardive dyskinesia. Treatment with levetiracetam 250 mg orally b.i.d. led to a significant improvement of abnormal movements within a week. Her AIMS score decreased to 8.

DISCUSSION

Tardive dyskinesia may be quite disabling and options include withdrawal of offending medication, or use of tetrabenazine or reserpine. Several reports also suggested improvement of tardive movement disorders with levetiracetam. In our patient, levetiracetam relieved symptoms of tardive dyskinesia and allowed continuous use of metoclopramide. Larger studies are needed to confirm its efficacy.

Authors+Show Affiliations

VA Pittsburgh HCS, Pittsburgh, PA 15240, USA. zivkovics@upmc.eduNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Case Reports
Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

17995990

Citation

Zivković, S A., et al. "Treatment of Tardive Dyskinesia With Levetiracetam in a Transplant Patient." Acta Neurologica Scandinavica, vol. 117, no. 5, 2008, pp. 351-3.
Zivković SA, Costa G, Bond G, et al. Treatment of tardive dyskinesia with levetiracetam in a transplant patient. Acta Neurol Scand. 2008;117(5):351-3.
Zivković, S. A., Costa, G., Bond, G., & Abu-Elmagd, K. M. (2008). Treatment of tardive dyskinesia with levetiracetam in a transplant patient. Acta Neurologica Scandinavica, 117(5), pp. 351-3.
Zivković SA, et al. Treatment of Tardive Dyskinesia With Levetiracetam in a Transplant Patient. Acta Neurol Scand. 2008;117(5):351-3. PubMed PMID: 17995990.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Treatment of tardive dyskinesia with levetiracetam in a transplant patient. AU - Zivković,S A, AU - Costa,G, AU - Bond,G, AU - Abu-Elmagd,K M, Y1 - 2007/11/08/ PY - 2007/11/13/pubmed PY - 2008/6/13/medline PY - 2007/11/13/entrez SP - 351 EP - 3 JF - Acta neurologica Scandinavica JO - Acta Neurol. Scand. VL - 117 IS - 5 N2 - OBJECTIVE: To describe successful treatment of tardive dyskinesia with levetiracetam. BACKGROUND: Tardive dyskinesia is a late-onset movement disorder caused by exposure to dopamine receptor blocking agents, most commonly neuroleptics. Metoclopramide is frequently used to treat gastrointestinal dysmotility. It has antidopaminergic properties, and is estimated to be responsible for two-thirds of drug-related movement disorders. DESIGN/METHODS: Case report. RESULTS: A 68-year-old woman presented with a history of intestinal transplantation (12 years ago; short gut syndrome related to bowel resection for rectal carcinoma) and renal transplantation (1 year ago; diabetes). She developed involuntary movements with stereotypic oro-buccal-lingual dyskinesias and right-sided choreiform movements. Her Abnormal Involuntary Movement Scale score (AIMS) score was 27. She has been treated with metoclopramide for gastrointestinal dysmotility for more than 10 years and was diagnosed with tardive dyskinesia. Treatment with levetiracetam 250 mg orally b.i.d. led to a significant improvement of abnormal movements within a week. Her AIMS score decreased to 8. DISCUSSION: Tardive dyskinesia may be quite disabling and options include withdrawal of offending medication, or use of tetrabenazine or reserpine. Several reports also suggested improvement of tardive movement disorders with levetiracetam. In our patient, levetiracetam relieved symptoms of tardive dyskinesia and allowed continuous use of metoclopramide. Larger studies are needed to confirm its efficacy. SN - 1600-0404 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/17995990/Treatment_of_tardive_dyskinesia_with_levetiracetam_in_a_transplant_patient_ L2 - https://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/resolve/openurl?genre=article&sid=nlm:pubmed&issn=0001-6314&date=2008&volume=117&issue=5&spage=351 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -