Tags

Type your tag names separated by a space and hit enter

Treatment of dry eye with punctal plugs.
Optom Clin. 1991; 1(4):103-17.OC

Abstract

Dry eye syndrome is a common finding for which treatment with artificial tears and sterile ointments is often satisfactory. In cases that do not respond to conventional therapy, it may be necessary to employ punctal plugs. Following dilation of the lower and upper puncta, temporary collagen implants are inserted, and the patient is asked to return within a few days for reevaluation. If dry eye symptoms have been significantly diminished, silicone plugs may be inserted in the lower puncta and the patient monitored for about a month before determining if occlusion of the upper puncta is also necessary. Extrusion of plugs and foreign body sensation are the most common complaints accompanying the procedure. Although intra-canalicular plugs have been developed to achieve semi-permanent occlusion, no controlled studies have yet been performed to determine their efficacy.

Authors

No affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Review

Language

eng

PubMed ID

1799831

Citation

Beisel, J G.. "Treatment of Dry Eye With Punctal Plugs." Optometry Clinics : the Official Publication of the Prentice Society, vol. 1, no. 4, 1991, pp. 103-17.
Beisel JG. Treatment of dry eye with punctal plugs. Optom Clin. 1991;1(4):103-17.
Beisel, J. G. (1991). Treatment of dry eye with punctal plugs. Optometry Clinics : the Official Publication of the Prentice Society, 1(4), 103-17.
Beisel JG. Treatment of Dry Eye With Punctal Plugs. Optom Clin. 1991;1(4):103-17. PubMed PMID: 1799831.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Treatment of dry eye with punctal plugs. A1 - Beisel,J G, PY - 1991/1/1/pubmed PY - 1991/1/1/medline PY - 1991/1/1/entrez SP - 103 EP - 17 JF - Optometry clinics : the official publication of the Prentice Society JO - Optom Clin VL - 1 IS - 4 N2 - Dry eye syndrome is a common finding for which treatment with artificial tears and sterile ointments is often satisfactory. In cases that do not respond to conventional therapy, it may be necessary to employ punctal plugs. Following dilation of the lower and upper puncta, temporary collagen implants are inserted, and the patient is asked to return within a few days for reevaluation. If dry eye symptoms have been significantly diminished, silicone plugs may be inserted in the lower puncta and the patient monitored for about a month before determining if occlusion of the upper puncta is also necessary. Extrusion of plugs and foreign body sensation are the most common complaints accompanying the procedure. Although intra-canalicular plugs have been developed to achieve semi-permanent occlusion, no controlled studies have yet been performed to determine their efficacy. SN - 1050-6918 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/1799831/Treatment_of_dry_eye_with_punctal_plugs_ DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -