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Is nutrient intake a gender-specific cause for enhanced susceptibility to alcohol-induced liver disease in women?
Alcohol Alcohol. 2008 Jan-Feb; 43(1):9-14.AA

Abstract

AIM

Women have a higher susceptibility to alcohol-induced liver disease (ALD) than men. Gender-related differences in food preference were described in previous studies for several populations, but not in alcohol abusers. As certain micronutrients are reported to take influence on the development of ALD in animal experiments, the hypothesis of the present retrospective cross-sectional study was that gender-dependent (micro-) nutrient intake in patients with ALD may cause the higher susceptibility of women to this disease.

METHODS

In 210 patients (male: 158, female: 52) with different stages of ALD (ALD1: mild stage of liver damage; ALD2: moderately severe changes of the liver with signs of hepatic inflammation; ALD3: severely impaired liver function) and in 336 controls (male: 208, female: 128), nutrient intake was determined by a computer-guided diet history, and related to the severity of ALD in dependence on the sex of the patients.

RESULTS

No significant differences between males and females with ALD were calculated for the intake (per kg body weight/day) of protein, carbohydrates, fat, and the intake (per kg body weight/day) of most micronutrients. In females with ALD, higher intake was found for vitamin C (ALD3), calcium (ALD2), iron (ALD1 and ALD2), and zinc (ALD1), but the consumption of none of these micronutrients seems to contribute to a higher susceptibility to ALD in females.

CONCLUSION

Though the present study confirms the higher susceptibility to ALD in women, the data of calculated daily macro- and micronutrient intake do not suggest any explicit influence of gender-specific nutrition in the development of ALD.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Hohenheim University, Department of Physiology of Nutrition and Gender Research, Stuttgart, Germany.No affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Comparative Study
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

18003723

Citation

Wagnerberger, Sabine, et al. "Is Nutrient Intake a Gender-specific Cause for Enhanced Susceptibility to Alcohol-induced Liver Disease in Women?" Alcohol and Alcoholism (Oxford, Oxfordshire), vol. 43, no. 1, 2008, pp. 9-14.
Wagnerberger S, Schäfer C, Schwarz E, et al. Is nutrient intake a gender-specific cause for enhanced susceptibility to alcohol-induced liver disease in women? Alcohol Alcohol. 2008;43(1):9-14.
Wagnerberger, S., Schäfer, C., Schwarz, E., Bode, C., & Parlesak, A. (2008). Is nutrient intake a gender-specific cause for enhanced susceptibility to alcohol-induced liver disease in women? Alcohol and Alcoholism (Oxford, Oxfordshire), 43(1), 9-14.
Wagnerberger S, et al. Is Nutrient Intake a Gender-specific Cause for Enhanced Susceptibility to Alcohol-induced Liver Disease in Women. Alcohol Alcohol. 2008 Jan-Feb;43(1):9-14. PubMed PMID: 18003723.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Is nutrient intake a gender-specific cause for enhanced susceptibility to alcohol-induced liver disease in women? AU - Wagnerberger,Sabine, AU - Schäfer,Christian, AU - Schwarz,Eveline, AU - Bode,Christiane, AU - Parlesak,Alexandr, Y1 - 2007/11/14/ PY - 2007/11/16/pubmed PY - 2008/2/1/medline PY - 2007/11/16/entrez SP - 9 EP - 14 JF - Alcohol and alcoholism (Oxford, Oxfordshire) JO - Alcohol Alcohol VL - 43 IS - 1 N2 - AIM: Women have a higher susceptibility to alcohol-induced liver disease (ALD) than men. Gender-related differences in food preference were described in previous studies for several populations, but not in alcohol abusers. As certain micronutrients are reported to take influence on the development of ALD in animal experiments, the hypothesis of the present retrospective cross-sectional study was that gender-dependent (micro-) nutrient intake in patients with ALD may cause the higher susceptibility of women to this disease. METHODS: In 210 patients (male: 158, female: 52) with different stages of ALD (ALD1: mild stage of liver damage; ALD2: moderately severe changes of the liver with signs of hepatic inflammation; ALD3: severely impaired liver function) and in 336 controls (male: 208, female: 128), nutrient intake was determined by a computer-guided diet history, and related to the severity of ALD in dependence on the sex of the patients. RESULTS: No significant differences between males and females with ALD were calculated for the intake (per kg body weight/day) of protein, carbohydrates, fat, and the intake (per kg body weight/day) of most micronutrients. In females with ALD, higher intake was found for vitamin C (ALD3), calcium (ALD2), iron (ALD1 and ALD2), and zinc (ALD1), but the consumption of none of these micronutrients seems to contribute to a higher susceptibility to ALD in females. CONCLUSION: Though the present study confirms the higher susceptibility to ALD in women, the data of calculated daily macro- and micronutrient intake do not suggest any explicit influence of gender-specific nutrition in the development of ALD. SN - 1464-3502 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/18003723/Is_nutrient_intake_a_gender_specific_cause_for_enhanced_susceptibility_to_alcohol_induced_liver_disease_in_women L2 - https://academic.oup.com/alcalc/article-lookup/doi/10.1093/alcalc/agm161 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -