Tags

Type your tag names separated by a space and hit enter

Acute-phase and 1-year follow-up results of a randomized controlled trial of CBT versus Befriending for first-episode psychosis: the ACE project.
Psychol Med. 2008 May; 38(5):725-35.PM

Abstract

BACKGROUND

The ACE project involved 62 participants with a first episode of psychosis randomly assigned to either a cognitive behaviour therapy (CBT) intervention known as Active Cognitive Therapy for Early Psychosis (ACE) or a control condition known as Befriending. The study hypotheses were that: (1) treating participants with ACE in the acute phase would lead to faster reductions in positive and negative symptoms and more rapid improvement in functioning than Befriending; (2) these improvements in symptoms and functioning would be sustained at a 1-year follow-up; and (3) ACE would lead to fewer hospitalizations than Befriending as assessed at the 1-year follow-up.

METHOD

Two therapists treated the participants across both conditions. Participants could not receive any more than 20 sessions within 14 weeks. Participants were assessed by independent raters on four primary outcome measures of symptoms and functioning: at pretreatment, the middle of treatment, the end of treatment and at 1-year follow-up. An independent pair of raters assessed treatment integrity.

RESULTS

Both groups improved significantly over time. ACE significantly outperformed Befriending by improving functioning at mid-treatment, but it did not improve positive or negative symptoms. Past the mid-treatment assessment, Befriending caught up with the ACE group and there were no significant differences in any outcome measure and in hospital admissions at follow-up.

CONCLUSIONS

There is some preliminary evidence that ACE promotes better early recovery in functioning and this finding needs to be replicated in other independent research centres with larger samples.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Departments of Psychology and Psychiatry, University of Melbourne and ORYGEN Research Centre, Parkville, Australia. henryjj@unimelb.edu.auNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Comparative Study
Journal Article
Randomized Controlled Trial
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

18005494

Citation

Jackson, H J., et al. "Acute-phase and 1-year Follow-up Results of a Randomized Controlled Trial of CBT Versus Befriending for First-episode Psychosis: the ACE Project." Psychological Medicine, vol. 38, no. 5, 2008, pp. 725-35.
Jackson HJ, McGorry PD, Killackey E, et al. Acute-phase and 1-year follow-up results of a randomized controlled trial of CBT versus Befriending for first-episode psychosis: the ACE project. Psychol Med. 2008;38(5):725-35.
Jackson, H. J., McGorry, P. D., Killackey, E., Bendall, S., Allott, K., Dudgeon, P., Gleeson, J., Johnson, T., & Harrigan, S. (2008). Acute-phase and 1-year follow-up results of a randomized controlled trial of CBT versus Befriending for first-episode psychosis: the ACE project. Psychological Medicine, 38(5), 725-35.
Jackson HJ, et al. Acute-phase and 1-year Follow-up Results of a Randomized Controlled Trial of CBT Versus Befriending for First-episode Psychosis: the ACE Project. Psychol Med. 2008;38(5):725-35. PubMed PMID: 18005494.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Acute-phase and 1-year follow-up results of a randomized controlled trial of CBT versus Befriending for first-episode psychosis: the ACE project. AU - Jackson,H J, AU - McGorry,P D, AU - Killackey,E, AU - Bendall,S, AU - Allott,K, AU - Dudgeon,P, AU - Gleeson,J, AU - Johnson,T, AU - Harrigan,S, Y1 - 2007/11/16/ PY - 2007/11/17/pubmed PY - 2008/8/23/medline PY - 2007/11/17/entrez SP - 725 EP - 35 JF - Psychological medicine JO - Psychol Med VL - 38 IS - 5 N2 - BACKGROUND: The ACE project involved 62 participants with a first episode of psychosis randomly assigned to either a cognitive behaviour therapy (CBT) intervention known as Active Cognitive Therapy for Early Psychosis (ACE) or a control condition known as Befriending. The study hypotheses were that: (1) treating participants with ACE in the acute phase would lead to faster reductions in positive and negative symptoms and more rapid improvement in functioning than Befriending; (2) these improvements in symptoms and functioning would be sustained at a 1-year follow-up; and (3) ACE would lead to fewer hospitalizations than Befriending as assessed at the 1-year follow-up. METHOD: Two therapists treated the participants across both conditions. Participants could not receive any more than 20 sessions within 14 weeks. Participants were assessed by independent raters on four primary outcome measures of symptoms and functioning: at pretreatment, the middle of treatment, the end of treatment and at 1-year follow-up. An independent pair of raters assessed treatment integrity. RESULTS: Both groups improved significantly over time. ACE significantly outperformed Befriending by improving functioning at mid-treatment, but it did not improve positive or negative symptoms. Past the mid-treatment assessment, Befriending caught up with the ACE group and there were no significant differences in any outcome measure and in hospital admissions at follow-up. CONCLUSIONS: There is some preliminary evidence that ACE promotes better early recovery in functioning and this finding needs to be replicated in other independent research centres with larger samples. SN - 0033-2917 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/18005494/Acute_phase_and_1_year_follow_up_results_of_a_randomized_controlled_trial_of_CBT_versus_Befriending_for_first_episode_psychosis:_the_ACE_project_ L2 - https://www.cambridge.org/core/product/identifier/S0033291707002061/type/journal_article DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -