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Behavioral comorbidity differs in subtypes of enuresis and urinary incontinence.
J Urol. 2008 Jan; 179(1):295-8; discussion 298.JU

Abstract

PURPOSE

The aim of this prospective study is to describe the association of comorbid behavioral and somatic factors in children with different forms of nocturnal enuresis and daytime incontinence referred to a tertiary center.

MATERIALS AND METHODS

A total of 166 consecutive children 5.1 to 16.4 years old were referred for detailed assessment between January 2004 and July 2006. Evaluation included a detailed history, pediatric examination, 24 to 48-hour voiding protocols, sonography and uroflow. Parents filled out the Child Behavior Checklist, a standardized parental questionnaire consisting of 113 problem items. ICD-10 diagnoses were given based on standardized mental state examination and mutual consensus conferences.

RESULTS

In the full sample externalizing disorders were more than twice as common as internalizing disorders. Differences were found between children with nocturnal enuresis and daytime incontinence regarding parent reported externalizing behavior scores as well as rates of "at least 1 ICD-10 psychiatric diagnosis" and comorbid encopresis. Children with monosymptomatic nocturnal enuresis showed fewer internalizing disorders and lower rates of "at least 1 ICD-10 psychiatric diagnosis" and comorbid encopresis compared to those with nonmonosymptomatic nocturnal enuresis, urge incontinence and voiding postponement. The results of sonography and uroflow measures also differed between groups.

CONCLUSIONS

Different subtypes of enuresis and urinary incontinence demonstrate differences in behavioral problems and psychiatric comorbidity. The highest rates of psychiatric comorbidity were found in the group of children with voiding postponement and the lowest were in children with monosymptomatic nocturnal enuresis. We recommend screening for comorbid psychiatric disorders in children with enuresis and urinary incontinence. Further investigations in a larger group of children are necessary.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry, Saarland University Hospital, Saarbrucken, Saarland, Germany. Susanne.zink@uniklinikum-saarland.deNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

18006020

Citation

Zink, Susanne, et al. "Behavioral Comorbidity Differs in Subtypes of Enuresis and Urinary Incontinence." The Journal of Urology, vol. 179, no. 1, 2008, pp. 295-8; discussion 298.
Zink S, Freitag CM, von Gontard A. Behavioral comorbidity differs in subtypes of enuresis and urinary incontinence. J Urol. 2008;179(1):295-8; discussion 298.
Zink, S., Freitag, C. M., & von Gontard, A. (2008). Behavioral comorbidity differs in subtypes of enuresis and urinary incontinence. The Journal of Urology, 179(1), 295-8; discussion 298.
Zink S, Freitag CM, von Gontard A. Behavioral Comorbidity Differs in Subtypes of Enuresis and Urinary Incontinence. J Urol. 2008;179(1):295-8; discussion 298. PubMed PMID: 18006020.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Behavioral comorbidity differs in subtypes of enuresis and urinary incontinence. AU - Zink,Susanne, AU - Freitag,Christine M, AU - von Gontard,Alexander, Y1 - 2007/11/19/ PY - 2007/06/01/received PY - 2007/11/17/pubmed PY - 2008/1/25/medline PY - 2007/11/17/entrez SP - 295-8; discussion 298 JF - The Journal of urology JO - J Urol VL - 179 IS - 1 N2 - PURPOSE: The aim of this prospective study is to describe the association of comorbid behavioral and somatic factors in children with different forms of nocturnal enuresis and daytime incontinence referred to a tertiary center. MATERIALS AND METHODS: A total of 166 consecutive children 5.1 to 16.4 years old were referred for detailed assessment between January 2004 and July 2006. Evaluation included a detailed history, pediatric examination, 24 to 48-hour voiding protocols, sonography and uroflow. Parents filled out the Child Behavior Checklist, a standardized parental questionnaire consisting of 113 problem items. ICD-10 diagnoses were given based on standardized mental state examination and mutual consensus conferences. RESULTS: In the full sample externalizing disorders were more than twice as common as internalizing disorders. Differences were found between children with nocturnal enuresis and daytime incontinence regarding parent reported externalizing behavior scores as well as rates of "at least 1 ICD-10 psychiatric diagnosis" and comorbid encopresis. Children with monosymptomatic nocturnal enuresis showed fewer internalizing disorders and lower rates of "at least 1 ICD-10 psychiatric diagnosis" and comorbid encopresis compared to those with nonmonosymptomatic nocturnal enuresis, urge incontinence and voiding postponement. The results of sonography and uroflow measures also differed between groups. CONCLUSIONS: Different subtypes of enuresis and urinary incontinence demonstrate differences in behavioral problems and psychiatric comorbidity. The highest rates of psychiatric comorbidity were found in the group of children with voiding postponement and the lowest were in children with monosymptomatic nocturnal enuresis. We recommend screening for comorbid psychiatric disorders in children with enuresis and urinary incontinence. Further investigations in a larger group of children are necessary. SN - 1527-3792 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/18006020/Behavioral_comorbidity_differs_in_subtypes_of_enuresis_and_urinary_incontinence_ L2 - https://www.jurology.com/doi/10.1016/j.juro.2007.09.007?url_ver=Z39.88-2003&rfr_id=ori:rid:crossref.org&rfr_dat=cr_pub=pubmed DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -