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Three-year tracking of fatty acid composition of plasma phospholipids in healthy children.
Ann Nutr Metab 2007; 51(5):433-8AN

Abstract

OBJECTIVES

The fatty acid composition of plasma phospholipids reflects the dietary fatty acid intake as well as endogenous turnover. We aimed at investigating the potential tracking of plasma phospholipid fatty acid composition in children that participated in a prospective cohort study.

METHODS

26 healthy children participated in a longitudinal study on health risks and had been enrolled after birth. All children were born at term with birth weights appropriate for gestational age. Follow-up took place at ages 24, 36 and 60 months. At each time point a 24-hour dietary recall was obtained, anthropometric parameters were measured and a blood sample for phospholipid fatty acid analysis was taken.

RESULTS

Dietary intake of saturated (SFA), monounsaturated (MUFA) and polyunsaturated (PUFA) fatty acids at the three time points were not correlated. We found lower values for plasma MUFA and the MUFA/SFA ratio at 60 months compared to 24 months. In contrast, total PUFA, total n-6 and n-6 long-chain polyunsaturated fatty acids (LC-PUFA) were higher at 60 months. Significant averaged correlation coefficients (average of Pearson's R for 24 versus 36 months and 36 versus 60 months) were found for n-6 LC-PUFA (r = 0.67), n-6/n-3 LC-PUFA ratio (r = 0.59) and arachidonic acid/linoleic acid ratio (r = 0.64). Partial tracking was found for the docosahexaenoic acid/alpha-linolenic acid ratio (r = 0.33). Body mass index and sum of skinfolds Z-scores were similar in the three evaluations.

CONCLUSIONS

A significant tracking of n-6 LC-PUFA, n-6 LC-PUFA/n-3 LC-PUFA ratio, arachidonic acid/linoleic acid ratio and docosahexaenoic acid/alpha-linolenic acid ratio may reflect an influence of individual endogenous fatty acid metabolism on plasma concentrations of some, but not all, fatty acids.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Paediatrics, H.S. João Faculty of Medicine, University of Porto, Porto, Portugal.No affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

18025816

Citation

Guerra, António, et al. "Three-year Tracking of Fatty Acid Composition of Plasma Phospholipids in Healthy Children." Annals of Nutrition & Metabolism, vol. 51, no. 5, 2007, pp. 433-8.
Guerra A, Demmelmair H, Toschke AM, et al. Three-year tracking of fatty acid composition of plasma phospholipids in healthy children. Ann Nutr Metab. 2007;51(5):433-8.
Guerra, A., Demmelmair, H., Toschke, A. M., & Koletzko, B. (2007). Three-year tracking of fatty acid composition of plasma phospholipids in healthy children. Annals of Nutrition & Metabolism, 51(5), pp. 433-8.
Guerra A, et al. Three-year Tracking of Fatty Acid Composition of Plasma Phospholipids in Healthy Children. Ann Nutr Metab. 2007;51(5):433-8. PubMed PMID: 18025816.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Three-year tracking of fatty acid composition of plasma phospholipids in healthy children. AU - Guerra,António, AU - Demmelmair,Hans, AU - Toschke,André Michael, AU - Koletzko,Berthold, Y1 - 2007/11/20/ PY - 2005/11/01/received PY - 2007/03/27/accepted PY - 2007/11/21/pubmed PY - 2007/12/22/medline PY - 2007/11/21/entrez SP - 433 EP - 8 JF - Annals of nutrition & metabolism JO - Ann. Nutr. Metab. VL - 51 IS - 5 N2 - OBJECTIVES: The fatty acid composition of plasma phospholipids reflects the dietary fatty acid intake as well as endogenous turnover. We aimed at investigating the potential tracking of plasma phospholipid fatty acid composition in children that participated in a prospective cohort study. METHODS: 26 healthy children participated in a longitudinal study on health risks and had been enrolled after birth. All children were born at term with birth weights appropriate for gestational age. Follow-up took place at ages 24, 36 and 60 months. At each time point a 24-hour dietary recall was obtained, anthropometric parameters were measured and a blood sample for phospholipid fatty acid analysis was taken. RESULTS: Dietary intake of saturated (SFA), monounsaturated (MUFA) and polyunsaturated (PUFA) fatty acids at the three time points were not correlated. We found lower values for plasma MUFA and the MUFA/SFA ratio at 60 months compared to 24 months. In contrast, total PUFA, total n-6 and n-6 long-chain polyunsaturated fatty acids (LC-PUFA) were higher at 60 months. Significant averaged correlation coefficients (average of Pearson's R for 24 versus 36 months and 36 versus 60 months) were found for n-6 LC-PUFA (r = 0.67), n-6/n-3 LC-PUFA ratio (r = 0.59) and arachidonic acid/linoleic acid ratio (r = 0.64). Partial tracking was found for the docosahexaenoic acid/alpha-linolenic acid ratio (r = 0.33). Body mass index and sum of skinfolds Z-scores were similar in the three evaluations. CONCLUSIONS: A significant tracking of n-6 LC-PUFA, n-6 LC-PUFA/n-3 LC-PUFA ratio, arachidonic acid/linoleic acid ratio and docosahexaenoic acid/alpha-linolenic acid ratio may reflect an influence of individual endogenous fatty acid metabolism on plasma concentrations of some, but not all, fatty acids. SN - 1421-9697 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/18025816/Three_year_tracking_of_fatty_acid_composition_of_plasma_phospholipids_in_healthy_children_ L2 - https://www.karger.com?DOI=10.1159/000111163 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -