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Long-term strict raw food diet is associated with favourable plasma beta-carotene and low plasma lycopene concentrations in Germans.
Br J Nutr 2008; 99(6):1293-300BJ

Abstract

Dietary carotenoids are associated with a reduced risk of chronic diseases. Raw food diets are predominantly plant-based diets that are practised with the intention of preventing chronic diseases by virtue of their high content of beneficial nutritive substances such as carotenoids. However, the benefit of a long-term adherence to these diets is controversial since little is known about their adequacy. Therefore, we investigated vitamin A and carotenoid status and related food sources in raw food diet adherents in Germany. Dietary vitamin A, carotenoid intake, plasma retinol and plasma carotenoids were determined in 198 (ninety-two male and 106 female) strict raw food diet adherents in a cross-sectional study. Raw food diet adherents consumed on average 95 weight% of their total food intake as raw food (approximately 1800 g/d), mainly fruits. Raw food diet adherents had an intake of 1301 retinol activity equivalents/d and 16.7 mg/d carotenoids. Plasma vitamin A status was normal in 82% of the subjects (> or = 1.05 micromol/l) and 63% had beta-carotene concentrations associated with chronic disease prevention (> or = 0.88 micromol/l). In 77% of subjects the lycopene status was below the reference values for average healthy populations (< 0.45 micromol/l). Fat contained in fruits, vegetables and nuts and oil consumption was a significant dietary determinant of plasma carotenoid concentrations (beta-carotene r 0.284; P < 0.05; lycopene r 0.168; P = 0.024). Long-term raw food diet adherents showed normal vitamin A status and achieve favourable plasma beta-carotene concentrations as recommended for chronic disease prevention, but showed low plasma lycopene levels. Plasma carotenoids in raw food adherents are predicted mainly by fat intake.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Institute of Nutritional Science, University of Giessen, Giessen, Germany.No affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

18028575

Citation

Garcia, Ada L., et al. "Long-term Strict Raw Food Diet Is Associated With Favourable Plasma Beta-carotene and Low Plasma Lycopene Concentrations in Germans." The British Journal of Nutrition, vol. 99, no. 6, 2008, pp. 1293-300.
Garcia AL, Koebnick C, Dagnelie PC, et al. Long-term strict raw food diet is associated with favourable plasma beta-carotene and low plasma lycopene concentrations in Germans. Br J Nutr. 2008;99(6):1293-300.
Garcia, A. L., Koebnick, C., Dagnelie, P. C., Strassner, C., Elmadfa, I., Katz, N., ... Hoffmann, I. (2008). Long-term strict raw food diet is associated with favourable plasma beta-carotene and low plasma lycopene concentrations in Germans. The British Journal of Nutrition, 99(6), pp. 1293-300.
Garcia AL, et al. Long-term Strict Raw Food Diet Is Associated With Favourable Plasma Beta-carotene and Low Plasma Lycopene Concentrations in Germans. Br J Nutr. 2008;99(6):1293-300. PubMed PMID: 18028575.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Long-term strict raw food diet is associated with favourable plasma beta-carotene and low plasma lycopene concentrations in Germans. AU - Garcia,Ada L, AU - Koebnick,Corinna, AU - Dagnelie,Peter C, AU - Strassner,Carola, AU - Elmadfa,Ibrahim, AU - Katz,Norbert, AU - Leitzmann,Claus, AU - Hoffmann,Ingrid, Y1 - 2007/11/21/ PY - 2007/11/22/pubmed PY - 2008/6/24/medline PY - 2007/11/22/entrez SP - 1293 EP - 300 JF - The British journal of nutrition JO - Br. J. Nutr. VL - 99 IS - 6 N2 - Dietary carotenoids are associated with a reduced risk of chronic diseases. Raw food diets are predominantly plant-based diets that are practised with the intention of preventing chronic diseases by virtue of their high content of beneficial nutritive substances such as carotenoids. However, the benefit of a long-term adherence to these diets is controversial since little is known about their adequacy. Therefore, we investigated vitamin A and carotenoid status and related food sources in raw food diet adherents in Germany. Dietary vitamin A, carotenoid intake, plasma retinol and plasma carotenoids were determined in 198 (ninety-two male and 106 female) strict raw food diet adherents in a cross-sectional study. Raw food diet adherents consumed on average 95 weight% of their total food intake as raw food (approximately 1800 g/d), mainly fruits. Raw food diet adherents had an intake of 1301 retinol activity equivalents/d and 16.7 mg/d carotenoids. Plasma vitamin A status was normal in 82% of the subjects (> or = 1.05 micromol/l) and 63% had beta-carotene concentrations associated with chronic disease prevention (> or = 0.88 micromol/l). In 77% of subjects the lycopene status was below the reference values for average healthy populations (< 0.45 micromol/l). Fat contained in fruits, vegetables and nuts and oil consumption was a significant dietary determinant of plasma carotenoid concentrations (beta-carotene r 0.284; P < 0.05; lycopene r 0.168; P = 0.024). Long-term raw food diet adherents showed normal vitamin A status and achieve favourable plasma beta-carotene concentrations as recommended for chronic disease prevention, but showed low plasma lycopene levels. Plasma carotenoids in raw food adherents are predicted mainly by fat intake. SN - 1475-2662 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/18028575/Long_term_strict_raw_food_diet_is_associated_with_favourable_plasma_beta_carotene_and_low_plasma_lycopene_concentrations_in_Germans_ L2 - https://www.cambridge.org/core/product/identifier/S0007114507868486/type/journal_article DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -