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Colon cancer: prognosis for different latitudes, age groups and seasons in Norway.
J Photochem Photobiol B. 2007 Dec 14; 89(2-3):148-55.JP

Abstract

The survival of colon cancer patients in Norway, as determined three years after diagnosis, is dependent on the season of diagnosis. This has been attributed to seasonal variations of the vitamin D status. Since solar radiation and food are the human sources of vitamin D, we divided Norway in three regions: The southeast region with a high annual dose of ultraviolet (UV) to the population, as evidenced by a high incidence rate of squamous cell carcinoma of the skin (SCC), the midwest region and the north region with low annual UV doses. The latter region is characterized by a high consumption of vitamin D, mainly through fish intake. Vacations to southern latitudes were equally frequent for all the three geographical regions. Two age groups were analyzed separately (< or =65 years and >65 years), since the photosynthesis of vitamin D(3) in skin decreases with age. In all three regions, and in both age groups, the survival was highest for summer and autumn diagnosis. The seasonal effect was slightly, but not significantly, better for the younger than for the older age group. The effect was similar for all three geographical regions, irrespective of SCC incidence.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Radiation Biology, Institute for Cancer Research, Montebello, 0310 Oslo, Norway. johan.moan@labmed.uio.noNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

18029190

Citation

Moan, Johan, et al. "Colon Cancer: Prognosis for Different Latitudes, Age Groups and Seasons in Norway." Journal of Photochemistry and Photobiology. B, Biology, vol. 89, no. 2-3, 2007, pp. 148-55.
Moan J, Porojnicu A, Lagunova Z, et al. Colon cancer: prognosis for different latitudes, age groups and seasons in Norway. J Photochem Photobiol B. 2007;89(2-3):148-55.
Moan, J., Porojnicu, A., Lagunova, Z., Berg, J. P., & Dahlback, A. (2007). Colon cancer: prognosis for different latitudes, age groups and seasons in Norway. Journal of Photochemistry and Photobiology. B, Biology, 89(2-3), 148-55.
Moan J, et al. Colon Cancer: Prognosis for Different Latitudes, Age Groups and Seasons in Norway. J Photochem Photobiol B. 2007 Dec 14;89(2-3):148-55. PubMed PMID: 18029190.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Colon cancer: prognosis for different latitudes, age groups and seasons in Norway. AU - Moan,Johan, AU - Porojnicu,Alina, AU - Lagunova,Zoya, AU - Berg,Jens Petter, AU - Dahlback,Arne, Y1 - 2007/09/19/ PY - 2007/07/16/received PY - 2007/08/28/revised PY - 2007/09/13/accepted PY - 2007/11/22/pubmed PY - 2008/3/14/medline PY - 2007/11/22/entrez SP - 148 EP - 55 JF - Journal of photochemistry and photobiology. B, Biology JO - J Photochem Photobiol B VL - 89 IS - 2-3 N2 - The survival of colon cancer patients in Norway, as determined three years after diagnosis, is dependent on the season of diagnosis. This has been attributed to seasonal variations of the vitamin D status. Since solar radiation and food are the human sources of vitamin D, we divided Norway in three regions: The southeast region with a high annual dose of ultraviolet (UV) to the population, as evidenced by a high incidence rate of squamous cell carcinoma of the skin (SCC), the midwest region and the north region with low annual UV doses. The latter region is characterized by a high consumption of vitamin D, mainly through fish intake. Vacations to southern latitudes were equally frequent for all the three geographical regions. Two age groups were analyzed separately (< or =65 years and >65 years), since the photosynthesis of vitamin D(3) in skin decreases with age. In all three regions, and in both age groups, the survival was highest for summer and autumn diagnosis. The seasonal effect was slightly, but not significantly, better for the younger than for the older age group. The effect was similar for all three geographical regions, irrespective of SCC incidence. SN - 1011-1344 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/18029190/Colon_cancer:_prognosis_for_different_latitudes_age_groups_and_seasons_in_Norway_ L2 - https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S1011-1344(07)00130-3 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -