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The evaluation of metabolic parameters and insulin sensitivity for a more robust diagnosis of the polycystic ovary syndrome.
Clin Endocrinol (Oxf) 2008; 69(1):52-60CE

Abstract

BACKGROUND

Polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) is considered predominantly as a hyperandrogenetic syndrome and the evaluation of metabolic parameters and insulin sensitivity is not mandatory.

CONTEXT

PCOS diagnostic criteria [National Institute of Health (NIH), Rotterdam Consensus (ROT), Androgen Excess Society (AES)] are unanimous recognized. We aimed to assess in women with suspected PCOS whether the application of the three diagnostic criteria differently characterizes the metabolic profile and insulin sensitivity.

DESIGN

Retrospective study in a cohort of women admitted to our Outpatient Clinic for suspected PCOS.

PATIENTS

Two hundred and four women with suspected PCOS in comparison to a group of normal, age-matched Sicilian women (N = 34) without signs of metabolic syndrome.

MEASUREMENTS

We evaluated hyperandrogenaemia and clinical hyperandrogenism, ovarian morphology, hypothalamo-hypophyseal axis and metabolic syndrome parameters. An oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT; 75 g glucose) measured areas under the curve (AUC) for insulin, C peptide and homeostasis model assessment of insulin-resistance (HOMA-IR) were performed.

RESULTS

The prevalence of PCOS was 51% according to NIH, 83% to ROT and 70.6% to AES, and only 100 patients were qualified simultaneously under these three criteria. The prevalence of the metabolic syndrome in PCOS women was 26.92% (NIH), 21.77% (ROT) and 23.61% (AES), respectively. In comparison to healthy women, PCOS women showed increased fasting insulinaemia (PCOS/ROT: P = 0.028; PCOS/NIH: P = 0.007; PCOS/EAS: P = 0.023), 120 min insulin after OGTT insulinaemia (for the three criteria: P < 0.001), AUC(2h) insulin (for the three criteria: P < 0.001) and AUC(2h) C peptide (for the three criteria: P < 0.001).

CONCLUSIONS

Our study highlights the fact that regardless of the diagnostic criteria used, evaluation of the metabolic parameters and insulin sensitivity is important for a correct diagnosis of PCOS and a therapeutic approach.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Section of Endocrinology, DOSAC, Università degli Studi di Palermo, Palermo, Italy.No affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Evaluation Study
Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

18034780

Citation

Amato, Marco Calogero, et al. "The Evaluation of Metabolic Parameters and Insulin Sensitivity for a More Robust Diagnosis of the Polycystic Ovary Syndrome." Clinical Endocrinology, vol. 69, no. 1, 2008, pp. 52-60.
Amato MC, Galluzzo A, Finocchiaro S, et al. The evaluation of metabolic parameters and insulin sensitivity for a more robust diagnosis of the polycystic ovary syndrome. Clin Endocrinol (Oxf). 2008;69(1):52-60.
Amato, M. C., Galluzzo, A., Finocchiaro, S., Criscimanna, A., & Giordano, C. (2008). The evaluation of metabolic parameters and insulin sensitivity for a more robust diagnosis of the polycystic ovary syndrome. Clinical Endocrinology, 69(1), pp. 52-60.
Amato MC, et al. The Evaluation of Metabolic Parameters and Insulin Sensitivity for a More Robust Diagnosis of the Polycystic Ovary Syndrome. Clin Endocrinol (Oxf). 2008;69(1):52-60. PubMed PMID: 18034780.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - The evaluation of metabolic parameters and insulin sensitivity for a more robust diagnosis of the polycystic ovary syndrome. AU - Amato,Marco Calogero, AU - Galluzzo,Aldo, AU - Finocchiaro,Sara, AU - Criscimanna,Angela, AU - Giordano,Carla, Y1 - 2008/07/01/ PY - 2007/11/24/pubmed PY - 2009/7/25/medline PY - 2007/11/24/entrez SP - 52 EP - 60 JF - Clinical endocrinology JO - Clin. Endocrinol. (Oxf) VL - 69 IS - 1 N2 - BACKGROUND: Polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) is considered predominantly as a hyperandrogenetic syndrome and the evaluation of metabolic parameters and insulin sensitivity is not mandatory. CONTEXT: PCOS diagnostic criteria [National Institute of Health (NIH), Rotterdam Consensus (ROT), Androgen Excess Society (AES)] are unanimous recognized. We aimed to assess in women with suspected PCOS whether the application of the three diagnostic criteria differently characterizes the metabolic profile and insulin sensitivity. DESIGN: Retrospective study in a cohort of women admitted to our Outpatient Clinic for suspected PCOS. PATIENTS: Two hundred and four women with suspected PCOS in comparison to a group of normal, age-matched Sicilian women (N = 34) without signs of metabolic syndrome. MEASUREMENTS: We evaluated hyperandrogenaemia and clinical hyperandrogenism, ovarian morphology, hypothalamo-hypophyseal axis and metabolic syndrome parameters. An oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT; 75 g glucose) measured areas under the curve (AUC) for insulin, C peptide and homeostasis model assessment of insulin-resistance (HOMA-IR) were performed. RESULTS: The prevalence of PCOS was 51% according to NIH, 83% to ROT and 70.6% to AES, and only 100 patients were qualified simultaneously under these three criteria. The prevalence of the metabolic syndrome in PCOS women was 26.92% (NIH), 21.77% (ROT) and 23.61% (AES), respectively. In comparison to healthy women, PCOS women showed increased fasting insulinaemia (PCOS/ROT: P = 0.028; PCOS/NIH: P = 0.007; PCOS/EAS: P = 0.023), 120 min insulin after OGTT insulinaemia (for the three criteria: P < 0.001), AUC(2h) insulin (for the three criteria: P < 0.001) and AUC(2h) C peptide (for the three criteria: P < 0.001). CONCLUSIONS: Our study highlights the fact that regardless of the diagnostic criteria used, evaluation of the metabolic parameters and insulin sensitivity is important for a correct diagnosis of PCOS and a therapeutic approach. SN - 1365-2265 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/18034780/The_evaluation_of_metabolic_parameters_and_insulin_sensitivity_for_a_more_robust_diagnosis_of_the_polycystic_ovary_syndrome_ L2 - https://doi.org/10.1111/j.1365-2265.2007.03145.x DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -