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Children's dairy intake in the United States: too little, too fat?
J Pediatr 2007; 151(6):642-6, 646.e1-2JPed

Abstract

OBJECTIVE

To compare reported dairy/calcium intake with intake recommendations and examination of food sources and fat levels of dairy intake in the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey 1999-2002.

STUDY DESIGN

Dietary, anthropometric, and sociodemographic data for 2- to 18-year-olds (n = 7716) were evaluated to compare intakes of dairy (MyPyramid) and calcium (Adequate Intake [AI]) recommendations. US Department of Agriculture food codes were used to identify mutually exclusive food groups of dairy-contributing foods, which were ranked in descending order proportional to total intake. Complex sample survey Student t tests were used to determine statistical significance among intakes in 4 age groups and between reported and recommended intakes.

RESULTS

Dairy consumption was not significantly different among age groups, but only 2- to 3-year-olds met the MyPyramid recommendation. Calcium intake was significantly different among age groups, and 2- to 8-year-olds met the AI. Intake of flavored milk ranged from 9% to 18%. More than half of the milk consumed by 2- to 3-year-olds was whole milk, and, with the exception of yogurt consumption in 2- to 3-year-olds, children choose to consume more of the highest-fat varieties of cheese, yogurt, ice cream, and dairy-based toppings.

CONCLUSIONS

Dairy and calcium intakes are inadequate in 4- to 18-year-olds. Most children consume the high-fat varieties of milk and dairy products. Focusing nutrition guidance efforts on increasing the intake of the low-fat dairy products, with special emphasis on increasing calcium intake in school-age children and adolescents through flavored low-fat milk products, may be beneficial.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Nutritional Sciences, Pennsylvania State University, University Park, PA 16802, USA. sxk72@psu.eduNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

18035145

Citation

Kranz, Sibylle, et al. "Children's Dairy Intake in the United States: Too Little, Too Fat?" The Journal of Pediatrics, vol. 151, no. 6, 2007, pp. 642-6, 646.e1-2.
Kranz S, Lin PJ, Wagstaff DA. Children's dairy intake in the United States: too little, too fat? J Pediatr. 2007;151(6):642-6, 646.e1-2.
Kranz, S., Lin, P. J., & Wagstaff, D. A. (2007). Children's dairy intake in the United States: too little, too fat? The Journal of Pediatrics, 151(6), pp. 642-6, 646.e1-2.
Kranz S, Lin PJ, Wagstaff DA. Children's Dairy Intake in the United States: Too Little, Too Fat. J Pediatr. 2007;151(6):642-6, 646.e1-2. PubMed PMID: 18035145.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Children's dairy intake in the United States: too little, too fat? AU - Kranz,Sibylle, AU - Lin,Po-Ju, AU - Wagstaff,David A, Y1 - 2007/07/24/ PY - 2006/12/29/received PY - 2007/03/26/revised PY - 2007/04/27/accepted PY - 2007/11/24/pubmed PY - 2007/12/7/medline PY - 2007/11/24/entrez SP - 642-6, 646.e1-2 JF - The Journal of pediatrics JO - J. Pediatr. VL - 151 IS - 6 N2 - OBJECTIVE: To compare reported dairy/calcium intake with intake recommendations and examination of food sources and fat levels of dairy intake in the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey 1999-2002. STUDY DESIGN: Dietary, anthropometric, and sociodemographic data for 2- to 18-year-olds (n = 7716) were evaluated to compare intakes of dairy (MyPyramid) and calcium (Adequate Intake [AI]) recommendations. US Department of Agriculture food codes were used to identify mutually exclusive food groups of dairy-contributing foods, which were ranked in descending order proportional to total intake. Complex sample survey Student t tests were used to determine statistical significance among intakes in 4 age groups and between reported and recommended intakes. RESULTS: Dairy consumption was not significantly different among age groups, but only 2- to 3-year-olds met the MyPyramid recommendation. Calcium intake was significantly different among age groups, and 2- to 8-year-olds met the AI. Intake of flavored milk ranged from 9% to 18%. More than half of the milk consumed by 2- to 3-year-olds was whole milk, and, with the exception of yogurt consumption in 2- to 3-year-olds, children choose to consume more of the highest-fat varieties of cheese, yogurt, ice cream, and dairy-based toppings. CONCLUSIONS: Dairy and calcium intakes are inadequate in 4- to 18-year-olds. Most children consume the high-fat varieties of milk and dairy products. Focusing nutrition guidance efforts on increasing the intake of the low-fat dairy products, with special emphasis on increasing calcium intake in school-age children and adolescents through flavored low-fat milk products, may be beneficial. SN - 1097-6833 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/18035145/Children's_dairy_intake_in_the_United_States:_too_little_too_fat L2 - https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S0022-3476(07)00444-1 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -