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Effects of cessation of a structured and supervised exercise conditioning program on lean mass and muscle strength in severely burned children.
Arch Phys Med Rehabil. 2007 Dec; 88(12 Suppl 2):S24-9.AP

Abstract

OBJECTIVE

To determine whether the benefits of exercise by burned children are maintained 3 months after the exercise program is concluded.

DESIGN

Randomized, controlled prospective study.

SETTING

Pediatric burn hospital.

PARTICIPANTS

Twenty severely burned children with a 40% or greater total body surface area burn, with main outcome measures completed before exercise training, immediately after 12 weeks of exercise training (intervention), and 12 weeks after training ended.

INTERVENTION

Randomization into a 12-week standard rehabilitation program at home (n=9) or a 12-week standard hospital rehabilitation program supplemented with an exercise-training program beginning 6 months after burn injury (n=11).

MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES

Assessment of lean body mass (LBM) using dual-energy x-ray absorptiometry and of leg isokinetic muscle strength at a speed of 150 degrees /s were done before, after the 12-week rehabilitation and exercise training program, and 3 months after the exercise program was completed (12mo postburn). The effects of exercise on the dependent variables were analyzed by repeated-measures analysis of variance. If we found a significant overall effect of time and/or intervention, we did a post hoc test for multiple comparison (Holm-Sidak). Results are expressed as mean +/- standard error.

RESULTS

The mean percentage increase in LBM and muscle strength was significantly greater in the exercise group (6.4%+/-1.9%, 40.7%+/-8.6%, respectively) than in the no-exercise group (1.9%+/-2.6% vs 3.4%+/-4.5%, respectively). Three months after cessation of the exercise program, LBM remained relatively unchanged in the no-exercise group (3.5%+/-1.8%). In contrast, LBM in the exercise group increased significantly (10.7%+/-4.8%, P=.03). In addition, muscle strength further increased by 17.9%+/-10.1% in the exercise group versus 7.2%+/-3.4% in the no-exercise group, although neither percentage increase was significant (P=.08 for exercise vs P=.61 for no exercise). Absolute values in LBM and muscle strength for both groups at 12 months postburn continued to be below historical or concurrent age-matched, nonburned children.

CONCLUSIONS

Participation in an exercise program resulted in a greater improvement in LBM and muscle strength in the exercise group than in the no-exercise group. Three months after the exercise training ended, there were persistent mild-to-moderate increases in LBM and muscle strength. Absolute levels continued to be below previously reported nonburned, age-matched values, however, which underscores the need for continued exercise to improve LBM and muscle strength in severely burned children.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Shriners Hospitals for Children, and Department of Surgery, University of Texas Medical Branch, Galveston, TX, USA. oesuman@utmb.eduNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Randomized Controlled Trial
Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Research Support, U.S. Gov't, Non-P.H.S.

Language

eng

PubMed ID

18036977

Citation

Suman, Oscar E., and David N. Herndon. "Effects of Cessation of a Structured and Supervised Exercise Conditioning Program On Lean Mass and Muscle Strength in Severely Burned Children." Archives of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation, vol. 88, no. 12 Suppl 2, 2007, pp. S24-9.
Suman OE, Herndon DN. Effects of cessation of a structured and supervised exercise conditioning program on lean mass and muscle strength in severely burned children. Arch Phys Med Rehabil. 2007;88(12 Suppl 2):S24-9.
Suman, O. E., & Herndon, D. N. (2007). Effects of cessation of a structured and supervised exercise conditioning program on lean mass and muscle strength in severely burned children. Archives of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation, 88(12 Suppl 2), S24-9.
Suman OE, Herndon DN. Effects of Cessation of a Structured and Supervised Exercise Conditioning Program On Lean Mass and Muscle Strength in Severely Burned Children. Arch Phys Med Rehabil. 2007;88(12 Suppl 2):S24-9. PubMed PMID: 18036977.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Effects of cessation of a structured and supervised exercise conditioning program on lean mass and muscle strength in severely burned children. AU - Suman,Oscar E, AU - Herndon,David N, PY - 2007/12/6/pubmed PY - 2007/12/12/medline PY - 2007/12/6/entrez SP - S24 EP - 9 JF - Archives of physical medicine and rehabilitation JO - Arch Phys Med Rehabil VL - 88 IS - 12 Suppl 2 N2 - OBJECTIVE: To determine whether the benefits of exercise by burned children are maintained 3 months after the exercise program is concluded. DESIGN: Randomized, controlled prospective study. SETTING: Pediatric burn hospital. PARTICIPANTS: Twenty severely burned children with a 40% or greater total body surface area burn, with main outcome measures completed before exercise training, immediately after 12 weeks of exercise training (intervention), and 12 weeks after training ended. INTERVENTION: Randomization into a 12-week standard rehabilitation program at home (n=9) or a 12-week standard hospital rehabilitation program supplemented with an exercise-training program beginning 6 months after burn injury (n=11). MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: Assessment of lean body mass (LBM) using dual-energy x-ray absorptiometry and of leg isokinetic muscle strength at a speed of 150 degrees /s were done before, after the 12-week rehabilitation and exercise training program, and 3 months after the exercise program was completed (12mo postburn). The effects of exercise on the dependent variables were analyzed by repeated-measures analysis of variance. If we found a significant overall effect of time and/or intervention, we did a post hoc test for multiple comparison (Holm-Sidak). Results are expressed as mean +/- standard error. RESULTS: The mean percentage increase in LBM and muscle strength was significantly greater in the exercise group (6.4%+/-1.9%, 40.7%+/-8.6%, respectively) than in the no-exercise group (1.9%+/-2.6% vs 3.4%+/-4.5%, respectively). Three months after cessation of the exercise program, LBM remained relatively unchanged in the no-exercise group (3.5%+/-1.8%). In contrast, LBM in the exercise group increased significantly (10.7%+/-4.8%, P=.03). In addition, muscle strength further increased by 17.9%+/-10.1% in the exercise group versus 7.2%+/-3.4% in the no-exercise group, although neither percentage increase was significant (P=.08 for exercise vs P=.61 for no exercise). Absolute values in LBM and muscle strength for both groups at 12 months postburn continued to be below historical or concurrent age-matched, nonburned children. CONCLUSIONS: Participation in an exercise program resulted in a greater improvement in LBM and muscle strength in the exercise group than in the no-exercise group. Three months after the exercise training ended, there were persistent mild-to-moderate increases in LBM and muscle strength. Absolute levels continued to be below previously reported nonburned, age-matched values, however, which underscores the need for continued exercise to improve LBM and muscle strength in severely burned children. SN - 1532-821X UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/18036977/Effects_of_cessation_of_a_structured_and_supervised_exercise_conditioning_program_on_lean_mass_and_muscle_strength_in_severely_burned_children_ L2 - https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S0003-9993(07)01552-3 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -