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Campus physicians' tobacco interventions with university students: a descriptive study of 16 Ontario university clinics.
Patient Educ Couns. 2008 Feb; 70(2):187-92.PE

Abstract

OBJECTIVE

About one-quarter of Canadian post-secondary students smoke cigarettes. We examined how physicians from Ontario university health clinics intervene with these young adult smokers.

METHOD

A convenience sample of 16 universities was identified and surveys were hand-delivered to all 228 physicians from these schools. A total of 125 doctors (54.82%) responded; 70 were from universities that were involved in a government-sponsored, coordinated, multi-campus, tobacco control initiative.

RESULTS

Twenty percent of doctors reported asking all or almost all patients about tobacco use; 25.22% asked fewer than half. Describing how they respond to patients identified as smokers, 96.00% of physicians advised cessation, 72.00% offered assistance, and 64.00% arranged for follow-up. Doctors discussed patients' tobacco use with 78.59% of smokers. Nicotine replacement therapies were rarely offered to patients wanting to quit. Doctors from universities involved in the tobacco control initiative were more likely to keep patient education materials in the examining room.

CONCLUSION

Because most doctors ask only some patients about tobacco use, they may be missing opportunities to provide appropriate advice and assistance to all smokers.

PRACTICE IMPLICATIONS

Physician education and support to the clinic are needed to improve the frequency and quality of physician-delivered smoking cessation services to post-secondary students.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Brock University, Canada. kelli-an.lawrance@brocku.caNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

18037601

Citation

Lawrance, Kelli-an G., and Sharon A. Lawler. "Campus Physicians' Tobacco Interventions With University Students: a Descriptive Study of 16 Ontario University Clinics." Patient Education and Counseling, vol. 70, no. 2, 2008, pp. 187-92.
Lawrance KA, Lawler SA. Campus physicians' tobacco interventions with university students: a descriptive study of 16 Ontario university clinics. Patient Educ Couns. 2008;70(2):187-92.
Lawrance, K. A., & Lawler, S. A. (2008). Campus physicians' tobacco interventions with university students: a descriptive study of 16 Ontario university clinics. Patient Education and Counseling, 70(2), 187-92.
Lawrance KA, Lawler SA. Campus Physicians' Tobacco Interventions With University Students: a Descriptive Study of 16 Ontario University Clinics. Patient Educ Couns. 2008;70(2):187-92. PubMed PMID: 18037601.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Campus physicians' tobacco interventions with university students: a descriptive study of 16 Ontario university clinics. AU - Lawrance,Kelli-an G, AU - Lawler,Sharon A, Y1 - 2007/11/26/ PY - 2007/05/31/received PY - 2007/09/21/revised PY - 2007/09/22/accepted PY - 2007/11/27/pubmed PY - 2008/4/18/medline PY - 2007/11/27/entrez SP - 187 EP - 92 JF - Patient education and counseling JO - Patient Educ Couns VL - 70 IS - 2 N2 - OBJECTIVE: About one-quarter of Canadian post-secondary students smoke cigarettes. We examined how physicians from Ontario university health clinics intervene with these young adult smokers. METHOD: A convenience sample of 16 universities was identified and surveys were hand-delivered to all 228 physicians from these schools. A total of 125 doctors (54.82%) responded; 70 were from universities that were involved in a government-sponsored, coordinated, multi-campus, tobacco control initiative. RESULTS: Twenty percent of doctors reported asking all or almost all patients about tobacco use; 25.22% asked fewer than half. Describing how they respond to patients identified as smokers, 96.00% of physicians advised cessation, 72.00% offered assistance, and 64.00% arranged for follow-up. Doctors discussed patients' tobacco use with 78.59% of smokers. Nicotine replacement therapies were rarely offered to patients wanting to quit. Doctors from universities involved in the tobacco control initiative were more likely to keep patient education materials in the examining room. CONCLUSION: Because most doctors ask only some patients about tobacco use, they may be missing opportunities to provide appropriate advice and assistance to all smokers. PRACTICE IMPLICATIONS: Physician education and support to the clinic are needed to improve the frequency and quality of physician-delivered smoking cessation services to post-secondary students. SN - 0738-3991 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/18037601/Campus_physicians'_tobacco_interventions_with_university_students:_a_descriptive_study_of_16_Ontario_university_clinics_ L2 - https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S0738-3991(07)00386-2 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -