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Pycnogenol, French maritime pine bark extract, augments endothelium-dependent vasodilation in humans.
Hypertens Res. 2007 Sep; 30(9):775-80.HR

Abstract

Pycnogenol, an extract of bark from the French maritime pine, Pinus pinaster Ait., consists of a concentrate of water-soluble polyphenols. Pycnogenol contains the bioflavonoids catechin and taxifolin as well as phenolcarbonic acids. Antioxidants, such as bioflavonoids, enhance endothelial nitric oxide (NO) synthase expression and subsequent NO release from endothelial cells. The purpose of this study was to determine Pycnogenol's effects on endothelium-dependent vasodilation in humans. This was a double-blind, randomized, placebo and active drug study. We evaluated forearm blood flow (FBF) responses to acetylcholine (ACh), an endothelium-dependent vasodilator, and to sodium nitroprusside (SNP), an endothelium-independent vasodilator, in healthy young men before and after 2 weeks of daily oral administration of Pycnogenol (180 mg/day) (n=8) or placebo (n=8). FBF was measured by using strain-gauge plethysmography. Neither the placebo nor Pycnogenol altered forearm or systemic hemodynamics. Pycnogenol, but not placebo, augmented FBF response to ACh, from 13.1 +/- 7.0 to 18.5 +/- 4.0 mL/min per 100 mL tissue (p<0.05). SNP-stimulated vasodilation was similar before and after 2 weeks of treatment in the control and Pycnogenol groups. The administration of N(G)-monomethyl-L-arginine, an NO synthase inhibitor, completely abolished Pycnogenol-induced augmentation of the FBF response to ACh. These findings suggest that Pycnogenol augments endothelium-dependent vasodilation by increasing in NO production. Pycnogenol would be useful for treating various diseases whose pathogeneses involve endothelial dysfunction.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Cardiovascular Physiology and Medicine, Hiroshima University Graduate School of Biomedical Sciences, Hiroshima, Japan.No affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Randomized Controlled Trial

Language

eng

PubMed ID

18037769

Citation

Nishioka, Kenji, et al. "Pycnogenol, French Maritime Pine Bark Extract, Augments Endothelium-dependent Vasodilation in Humans." Hypertension Research : Official Journal of the Japanese Society of Hypertension, vol. 30, no. 9, 2007, pp. 775-80.
Nishioka K, Hidaka T, Nakamura S, et al. Pycnogenol, French maritime pine bark extract, augments endothelium-dependent vasodilation in humans. Hypertens Res. 2007;30(9):775-80.
Nishioka, K., Hidaka, T., Nakamura, S., Umemura, T., Jitsuiki, D., Soga, J., Goto, C., Chayama, K., Yoshizumi, M., & Higashi, Y. (2007). Pycnogenol, French maritime pine bark extract, augments endothelium-dependent vasodilation in humans. Hypertension Research : Official Journal of the Japanese Society of Hypertension, 30(9), 775-80.
Nishioka K, et al. Pycnogenol, French Maritime Pine Bark Extract, Augments Endothelium-dependent Vasodilation in Humans. Hypertens Res. 2007;30(9):775-80. PubMed PMID: 18037769.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Pycnogenol, French maritime pine bark extract, augments endothelium-dependent vasodilation in humans. AU - Nishioka,Kenji, AU - Hidaka,Takayuki, AU - Nakamura,Shuji, AU - Umemura,Takashi, AU - Jitsuiki,Daisuke, AU - Soga,Junko, AU - Goto,Chikara, AU - Chayama,Kazuaki, AU - Yoshizumi,Masao, AU - Higashi,Yukihito, PY - 2007/11/27/pubmed PY - 2008/1/30/medline PY - 2007/11/27/entrez SP - 775 EP - 80 JF - Hypertension research : official journal of the Japanese Society of Hypertension JO - Hypertens Res VL - 30 IS - 9 N2 - Pycnogenol, an extract of bark from the French maritime pine, Pinus pinaster Ait., consists of a concentrate of water-soluble polyphenols. Pycnogenol contains the bioflavonoids catechin and taxifolin as well as phenolcarbonic acids. Antioxidants, such as bioflavonoids, enhance endothelial nitric oxide (NO) synthase expression and subsequent NO release from endothelial cells. The purpose of this study was to determine Pycnogenol's effects on endothelium-dependent vasodilation in humans. This was a double-blind, randomized, placebo and active drug study. We evaluated forearm blood flow (FBF) responses to acetylcholine (ACh), an endothelium-dependent vasodilator, and to sodium nitroprusside (SNP), an endothelium-independent vasodilator, in healthy young men before and after 2 weeks of daily oral administration of Pycnogenol (180 mg/day) (n=8) or placebo (n=8). FBF was measured by using strain-gauge plethysmography. Neither the placebo nor Pycnogenol altered forearm or systemic hemodynamics. Pycnogenol, but not placebo, augmented FBF response to ACh, from 13.1 +/- 7.0 to 18.5 +/- 4.0 mL/min per 100 mL tissue (p<0.05). SNP-stimulated vasodilation was similar before and after 2 weeks of treatment in the control and Pycnogenol groups. The administration of N(G)-monomethyl-L-arginine, an NO synthase inhibitor, completely abolished Pycnogenol-induced augmentation of the FBF response to ACh. These findings suggest that Pycnogenol augments endothelium-dependent vasodilation by increasing in NO production. Pycnogenol would be useful for treating various diseases whose pathogeneses involve endothelial dysfunction. SN - 0916-9636 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/18037769/Pycnogenol_French_maritime_pine_bark_extract_augments_endothelium_dependent_vasodilation_in_humans_ L2 - https://medlineplus.gov/bloodthinners.html DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -