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Trends in the incidence, mortality, and survival rates of oral and pharyngeal cancer in a high-risk area in Michigan, USA.
Community Dent Oral Epidemiol 2007; 35(6):489-99CD

Abstract

OBJECTIVE

The aim of this analysis was to analyze the incidence, mortality and survival rates for the city of Detroit and Wayne County, Michigan. In Detroit, about four out of the five residents are African-Americans.

METHODS

Rates and standard errors on oral cancer incidence, survival, and mortality by county of residence, race, gender, stage of diagnosis were provided by the Michigan Cancer Surveillance Program, which is maintained by the Michigan Department of Community Health. Rates were expressed per 100,000 individuals and age adjusted to reflect the distribution of the USA population in 2000. Analysis for trends was conducted by the authors using the National Cancer Institutes' joinpoint regression program (version 3.0).

RESULTS

In 1993-2002, the incidence rate of oral cancer in Michigan (one of the 50 states in the USA) was 11.3 per 100,000, and in the city of Detroit, it was 16.6. In African-American males in Michigan the incidence rate was 24.3 per 100,000, one of the highest among all American males. The city of Detroit, with 9% of the total state population, had 13.1% of all new cases. Between 1993 and 2002, there was a drop in incidence rates in Michigan and Detroit. However, there was an increase in mortality rates in Michigan and Detroit between 2000 and 2002. In Detroit, the incidence and mortality rates of 'white' and African-American males were not different and the highest incidence rates were found in adults between the ages of 50 and 74 years. In the state, the peak incidence rates were found in adults 75 years or older. In 2000-2002, residents of Detroit had the lowest percentage (28.3%) of cases detected at early cancerous stage (in situ or localized) compared with rates in Michigan. African-Americans in Michigan had a 5-year survival rate of 34.9% compared with the state average of 54.6%.

CONCLUSIONS

African-American males in Detroit accounted for a larger proportion of the oral cancer cases relative to their population size. There was surprising similarity between the incidence and mortality rates of African and 'white' Americans in Detroit. While the incidence rates have declined in Michigan and Detroit, mortality rates have increased between 2000 and 2002. This finding is contrary to national trends. In order to target programs to prevent oral cancer, oral cancer statistics for in small areas or high-risk populations should be evaluated separately.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Operative Dentistry, School of Dentistry, University of Iowa, Iowa City, IA, USA.No affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural

Language

eng

PubMed ID

18039291

Citation

Kolker, Justine L., et al. "Trends in the Incidence, Mortality, and Survival Rates of Oral and Pharyngeal Cancer in a High-risk Area in Michigan, USA." Community Dentistry and Oral Epidemiology, vol. 35, no. 6, 2007, pp. 489-99.
Kolker JL, Ismail AI, Sohn W, et al. Trends in the incidence, mortality, and survival rates of oral and pharyngeal cancer in a high-risk area in Michigan, USA. Community Dent Oral Epidemiol. 2007;35(6):489-99.
Kolker, J. L., Ismail, A. I., Sohn, W., & Ramaswami, N. (2007). Trends in the incidence, mortality, and survival rates of oral and pharyngeal cancer in a high-risk area in Michigan, USA. Community Dentistry and Oral Epidemiology, 35(6), pp. 489-99.
Kolker JL, et al. Trends in the Incidence, Mortality, and Survival Rates of Oral and Pharyngeal Cancer in a High-risk Area in Michigan, USA. Community Dent Oral Epidemiol. 2007;35(6):489-99. PubMed PMID: 18039291.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Trends in the incidence, mortality, and survival rates of oral and pharyngeal cancer in a high-risk area in Michigan, USA. AU - Kolker,Justine L, AU - Ismail,Amid I, AU - Sohn,Woosung, AU - Ramaswami,Neerrajah, PY - 2007/11/28/pubmed PY - 2008/1/31/medline PY - 2007/11/28/entrez SP - 489 EP - 99 JF - Community dentistry and oral epidemiology JO - Community Dent Oral Epidemiol VL - 35 IS - 6 N2 - OBJECTIVE: The aim of this analysis was to analyze the incidence, mortality and survival rates for the city of Detroit and Wayne County, Michigan. In Detroit, about four out of the five residents are African-Americans. METHODS: Rates and standard errors on oral cancer incidence, survival, and mortality by county of residence, race, gender, stage of diagnosis were provided by the Michigan Cancer Surveillance Program, which is maintained by the Michigan Department of Community Health. Rates were expressed per 100,000 individuals and age adjusted to reflect the distribution of the USA population in 2000. Analysis for trends was conducted by the authors using the National Cancer Institutes' joinpoint regression program (version 3.0). RESULTS: In 1993-2002, the incidence rate of oral cancer in Michigan (one of the 50 states in the USA) was 11.3 per 100,000, and in the city of Detroit, it was 16.6. In African-American males in Michigan the incidence rate was 24.3 per 100,000, one of the highest among all American males. The city of Detroit, with 9% of the total state population, had 13.1% of all new cases. Between 1993 and 2002, there was a drop in incidence rates in Michigan and Detroit. However, there was an increase in mortality rates in Michigan and Detroit between 2000 and 2002. In Detroit, the incidence and mortality rates of 'white' and African-American males were not different and the highest incidence rates were found in adults between the ages of 50 and 74 years. In the state, the peak incidence rates were found in adults 75 years or older. In 2000-2002, residents of Detroit had the lowest percentage (28.3%) of cases detected at early cancerous stage (in situ or localized) compared with rates in Michigan. African-Americans in Michigan had a 5-year survival rate of 34.9% compared with the state average of 54.6%. CONCLUSIONS: African-American males in Detroit accounted for a larger proportion of the oral cancer cases relative to their population size. There was surprising similarity between the incidence and mortality rates of African and 'white' Americans in Detroit. While the incidence rates have declined in Michigan and Detroit, mortality rates have increased between 2000 and 2002. This finding is contrary to national trends. In order to target programs to prevent oral cancer, oral cancer statistics for in small areas or high-risk populations should be evaluated separately. SN - 1600-0528 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/18039291/Trends_in_the_incidence_mortality_and_survival_rates_of_oral_and_pharyngeal_cancer_in_a_high_risk_area_in_Michigan_USA_ L2 - https://doi.org/10.1111/j.1600-0528.2007.00371.x DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -