Tags

Type your tag names separated by a space and hit enter

Anemia and intestinal parasite infection in school children in rural Vietnam.
Asia Pac J Clin Nutr. 2007; 16(4):716-23.AP

Abstract

OBJECTIVES

This study hypothesized that besides iron deficiency, intestinal parasites infection is also a determinant of anemia in schoolchildren in rural Vietnam.

METHODS

400 primary schoolchildren from 20 primary schools in Tam Nong district, a poor rural area in Vietnam, were randomly selected from enrollment lists. Venous blood (5ml) was collected in a cross sectional study and analyzed for hemoglobin (Hb), serum ferritin (SF), serum transferrin receptor (TfR), serum C-reactive protein (CRP) and total immunoglobulin E (IgE). Stools samples were examined for hookworm, Trichuris, and Ascaris infection. Logistic regression was used to assess the effect of intestinal parasites on anemia.

RESULTS

The prevalence of anemia (Hb < 115g/l) was 25%. Iron deficiency (TfR > 8.5mg/L) occurred in 2% of the children. The prevalence of intestinal parasites was 92% with the highest prevalence for Trichuris (76%) and Ascaris (71%). More than 30% and 80% of the children showed an elevated CRP (> or = 8 mg/L) and IgE (> 90 IU/ml) concentration. Anemia status was borderline significantly associated with SF and not associated with TfR and CRP. The prevalence odds ratio for Trichuris infection was 1.96 (95% CI 1.07-3.59) and 2.00 (95% CI 1.08-3.65) with iron deficiency reflected by TfR and SF, respectively.

CONCLUSION

Anemia is highly prevalent among schoolchildren in Vietnam but may not be associated with iron deficiency. Trichuris infection is associated with a doubled risk of anemia, not mediated through iron deficiency. Chronic infection may play a role in anemia, but needs further investigation.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Nutrition Department, Hanoi Medical University, Vietnam. huong.lethi@wur.nlNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

18042534

Citation

Le, Huong Thi, et al. "Anemia and Intestinal Parasite Infection in School Children in Rural Vietnam." Asia Pacific Journal of Clinical Nutrition, vol. 16, no. 4, 2007, pp. 716-23.
Le HT, Brouwer ID, Verhoef H, et al. Anemia and intestinal parasite infection in school children in rural Vietnam. Asia Pac J Clin Nutr. 2007;16(4):716-23.
Le, H. T., Brouwer, I. D., Verhoef, H., Nguyen, K. C., & Kok, F. J. (2007). Anemia and intestinal parasite infection in school children in rural Vietnam. Asia Pacific Journal of Clinical Nutrition, 16(4), 716-23.
Le HT, et al. Anemia and Intestinal Parasite Infection in School Children in Rural Vietnam. Asia Pac J Clin Nutr. 2007;16(4):716-23. PubMed PMID: 18042534.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Anemia and intestinal parasite infection in school children in rural Vietnam. AU - Le,Huong Thi, AU - Brouwer,Inge D, AU - Verhoef,Hans, AU - Nguyen,Khan Cong, AU - Kok,Frans J, PY - 2007/11/29/pubmed PY - 2008/2/5/medline PY - 2007/11/29/entrez SP - 716 EP - 23 JF - Asia Pacific journal of clinical nutrition JO - Asia Pac J Clin Nutr VL - 16 IS - 4 N2 - OBJECTIVES: This study hypothesized that besides iron deficiency, intestinal parasites infection is also a determinant of anemia in schoolchildren in rural Vietnam. METHODS: 400 primary schoolchildren from 20 primary schools in Tam Nong district, a poor rural area in Vietnam, were randomly selected from enrollment lists. Venous blood (5ml) was collected in a cross sectional study and analyzed for hemoglobin (Hb), serum ferritin (SF), serum transferrin receptor (TfR), serum C-reactive protein (CRP) and total immunoglobulin E (IgE). Stools samples were examined for hookworm, Trichuris, and Ascaris infection. Logistic regression was used to assess the effect of intestinal parasites on anemia. RESULTS: The prevalence of anemia (Hb < 115g/l) was 25%. Iron deficiency (TfR > 8.5mg/L) occurred in 2% of the children. The prevalence of intestinal parasites was 92% with the highest prevalence for Trichuris (76%) and Ascaris (71%). More than 30% and 80% of the children showed an elevated CRP (> or = 8 mg/L) and IgE (> 90 IU/ml) concentration. Anemia status was borderline significantly associated with SF and not associated with TfR and CRP. The prevalence odds ratio for Trichuris infection was 1.96 (95% CI 1.07-3.59) and 2.00 (95% CI 1.08-3.65) with iron deficiency reflected by TfR and SF, respectively. CONCLUSION: Anemia is highly prevalent among schoolchildren in Vietnam but may not be associated with iron deficiency. Trichuris infection is associated with a doubled risk of anemia, not mediated through iron deficiency. Chronic infection may play a role in anemia, but needs further investigation. SN - 0964-7058 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/18042534/Anemia_and_intestinal_parasite_infection_in_school_children_in_rural_Vietnam_ L2 - http://apjcn.nhri.org.tw/server/APJCN/16/4/716.pdf DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -