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Antioxidant vitamin supplement use and risk of dementia or Alzheimer's disease in older adults.

Abstract

OBJECTIVES

To examine whether use of vitamins C or E alone or in combination was associated with lower incidence of dementia or Alzheimer's disease (AD).

DESIGN

Prospective cohort study.

SETTING

Group Health Cooperative, Seattle, Washington.

PARTICIPANTS

Two thousand nine hundred sixty-nine participants aged 65 and older without cognitive impairment at baseline in the Adult Changes in Thought study.

MEASUREMENTS

Participants were followed biennially to identify incident dementia and AD diagnosed according to standard criteria. Participants were considered to be users of vitamins C or E if they self-reported use for at least 1 week during the month before baseline.

RESULTS

Over a mean follow-up+/-standard deviation of 5.5+/-2.7 years, 405 subjects developed dementia (289 developed AD). The use of vitamin E was not associated with dementia (adjusted hazard ratio (HR)=0.98, 95% confidence interval (CI)=0.77-1.25) or with AD (HR=1.04; 95% CI=0.78-1.39). No association was found between vitamin C alone (dementia: HR=0.90, 95% CI=0.71-1.13; AD: HR=0.95, 95% CI=0.72-1.25) or concurrent use of vitamin C and E (dementia: HR=0.93, 95% CI=0.72-1.20; AD: HR=1.00, 95% CI=0.73-1.35) and either outcome.

CONCLUSION

In this study, the use of supplemental vitamin E and C, alone or in combination, did not reduce risk of AD or overall dementia over 5.5 years of follow-up.

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  • Authors+Show Affiliations

    ,

    School of Pharmacy, University of Washington, Seattle, Washington 98195, USA. slgray@u.washington.edu

    , , , , , ,

    Source

    MeSH

    Aged
    Alzheimer Disease
    Antioxidants
    Chi-Square Distribution
    Confounding Factors (Epidemiology)
    Dementia
    Female
    Humans
    Incidence
    Male
    Proportional Hazards Models
    Prospective Studies
    Risk Factors
    Vitamins
    Washington

    Pub Type(s)

    Journal Article
    Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural

    Language

    eng

    PubMed ID

    18047492

    Citation

    Gray, Shelly L., et al. "Antioxidant Vitamin Supplement Use and Risk of Dementia or Alzheimer's Disease in Older Adults." Journal of the American Geriatrics Society, vol. 56, no. 2, 2008, pp. 291-5.
    Gray SL, Anderson ML, Crane PK, et al. Antioxidant vitamin supplement use and risk of dementia or Alzheimer's disease in older adults. J Am Geriatr Soc. 2008;56(2):291-5.
    Gray, S. L., Anderson, M. L., Crane, P. K., Breitner, J. C., McCormick, W., Bowen, J. D., ... Larson, E. (2008). Antioxidant vitamin supplement use and risk of dementia or Alzheimer's disease in older adults. Journal of the American Geriatrics Society, 56(2), pp. 291-5.
    Gray SL, et al. Antioxidant Vitamin Supplement Use and Risk of Dementia or Alzheimer's Disease in Older Adults. J Am Geriatr Soc. 2008;56(2):291-5. PubMed PMID: 18047492.
    * Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
    TY - JOUR T1 - Antioxidant vitamin supplement use and risk of dementia or Alzheimer's disease in older adults. AU - Gray,Shelly L, AU - Anderson,Melissa L, AU - Crane,Paul K, AU - Breitner,John C S, AU - McCormick,Wayne, AU - Bowen,James D, AU - Teri,Linda, AU - Larson,Eric, Y1 - 2007/11/27/ PY - 2007/12/1/pubmed PY - 2008/3/7/medline PY - 2007/12/1/entrez SP - 291 EP - 5 JF - Journal of the American Geriatrics Society JO - J Am Geriatr Soc VL - 56 IS - 2 N2 - OBJECTIVES: To examine whether use of vitamins C or E alone or in combination was associated with lower incidence of dementia or Alzheimer's disease (AD). DESIGN: Prospective cohort study. SETTING: Group Health Cooperative, Seattle, Washington. PARTICIPANTS: Two thousand nine hundred sixty-nine participants aged 65 and older without cognitive impairment at baseline in the Adult Changes in Thought study. MEASUREMENTS: Participants were followed biennially to identify incident dementia and AD diagnosed according to standard criteria. Participants were considered to be users of vitamins C or E if they self-reported use for at least 1 week during the month before baseline. RESULTS: Over a mean follow-up+/-standard deviation of 5.5+/-2.7 years, 405 subjects developed dementia (289 developed AD). The use of vitamin E was not associated with dementia (adjusted hazard ratio (HR)=0.98, 95% confidence interval (CI)=0.77-1.25) or with AD (HR=1.04; 95% CI=0.78-1.39). No association was found between vitamin C alone (dementia: HR=0.90, 95% CI=0.71-1.13; AD: HR=0.95, 95% CI=0.72-1.25) or concurrent use of vitamin C and E (dementia: HR=0.93, 95% CI=0.72-1.20; AD: HR=1.00, 95% CI=0.73-1.35) and either outcome. CONCLUSION: In this study, the use of supplemental vitamin E and C, alone or in combination, did not reduce risk of AD or overall dementia over 5.5 years of follow-up. SN - 1532-5415 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/18047492/Antioxidant_vitamin_supplement_use_and_risk_of_dementia_or_Alzheimer's_disease_in_older_adults_ L2 - https://doi.org/10.1111/j.1532-5415.2007.01531.x DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -