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A momentary assessment study of the reputed emotional phenotype associated with borderline personality disorder.
Psychol Med. 2008 Sep; 38(9):1231-9.PM

Abstract

BACKGROUND

Stress is postulated to play an essential role in the expression of core borderline symptoms. However, the phenomenology of stress reactivity in borderline personality disorder remains unclear. The current study investigated the phenomenology of stress sensitivity in borderline personality disorder in the flow of daily life and compared this with stress sensitivity in patients suffering from psychotic disorders, a group so far known to report the largest reactivity to stress.

METHOD

A total of 44 borderline patients, 42 patients with psychotic disorder and 49 healthy controls were studied with the Experience Sampling Method (a structured diary technique assessing current context and mood in daily life) to assess: (1) appraised subjective stress related to daily events and activities; and (2) emotional reactivity conceptualized as changes in positive and negative affect.

RESULTS

Multilevel regression analysis revealed that subjects with borderline personality disorder experienced significantly more emotional reactivity to daily life stress compared with both patients with psychosis and healthy controls, as evidenced by a larger increase in negative affect and a larger decrease in positive affect following stress.

CONCLUSION

These results are the first to ecologically validate the incorporation of stress reactive symptoms in the diagnosis of borderline personality disorder. Borderline patients continually react stronger than patients with psychosis and healthy controls to small disturbances that continually happen in the natural flow of everyday life. Altered emotional stress reactivity may define borderline personality disorder.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Psychiatry and Neuropsychology, South Limburg Mental Health Research and Teaching Network, EURON, Maastricht University, The Netherlands.No affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

18047769

Citation

Glaser, J-P, et al. "A Momentary Assessment Study of the Reputed Emotional Phenotype Associated With Borderline Personality Disorder." Psychological Medicine, vol. 38, no. 9, 2008, pp. 1231-9.
Glaser JP, Van Os J, Mengelers R, et al. A momentary assessment study of the reputed emotional phenotype associated with borderline personality disorder. Psychol Med. 2008;38(9):1231-9.
Glaser, J. P., Van Os, J., Mengelers, R., & Myin-Germeys, I. (2008). A momentary assessment study of the reputed emotional phenotype associated with borderline personality disorder. Psychological Medicine, 38(9), 1231-9.
Glaser JP, et al. A Momentary Assessment Study of the Reputed Emotional Phenotype Associated With Borderline Personality Disorder. Psychol Med. 2008;38(9):1231-9. PubMed PMID: 18047769.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - A momentary assessment study of the reputed emotional phenotype associated with borderline personality disorder. AU - Glaser,J-P, AU - Van Os,J, AU - Mengelers,R, AU - Myin-Germeys,I, Y1 - 2007/11/30/ PY - 2007/12/1/pubmed PY - 2008/10/22/medline PY - 2007/12/1/entrez SP - 1231 EP - 9 JF - Psychological medicine JO - Psychol Med VL - 38 IS - 9 N2 - BACKGROUND: Stress is postulated to play an essential role in the expression of core borderline symptoms. However, the phenomenology of stress reactivity in borderline personality disorder remains unclear. The current study investigated the phenomenology of stress sensitivity in borderline personality disorder in the flow of daily life and compared this with stress sensitivity in patients suffering from psychotic disorders, a group so far known to report the largest reactivity to stress. METHOD: A total of 44 borderline patients, 42 patients with psychotic disorder and 49 healthy controls were studied with the Experience Sampling Method (a structured diary technique assessing current context and mood in daily life) to assess: (1) appraised subjective stress related to daily events and activities; and (2) emotional reactivity conceptualized as changes in positive and negative affect. RESULTS: Multilevel regression analysis revealed that subjects with borderline personality disorder experienced significantly more emotional reactivity to daily life stress compared with both patients with psychosis and healthy controls, as evidenced by a larger increase in negative affect and a larger decrease in positive affect following stress. CONCLUSION: These results are the first to ecologically validate the incorporation of stress reactive symptoms in the diagnosis of borderline personality disorder. Borderline patients continually react stronger than patients with psychosis and healthy controls to small disturbances that continually happen in the natural flow of everyday life. Altered emotional stress reactivity may define borderline personality disorder. SN - 0033-2917 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/18047769/A_momentary_assessment_study_of_the_reputed_emotional_phenotype_associated_with_borderline_personality_disorder_ L2 - https://www.cambridge.org/core/product/identifier/S0033291707002322/type/journal_article DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -