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Reduction in hepatitis C-related liver disease associated with GB virus C in human immunodeficiency virus coinfection.
Gastroenterology. 2007 Dec; 133(6):1821-30.G

Abstract

BACKGROUND & AIMS

It has been reported that GB virus C infection (GBV-C) leads to improved morbidity and mortality in patients with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection. However, GBV-C has no effect on the course of liver disease in hepatitis C virus (HCV) monoinfection. The aim of the study was to determine the influence of GBV-C infection on liver disease in patients with HCV/HIV coinfection.

METHODS

Data on 158 HCV/HIV patients were collected from January 1996 to October 2005. Two plasma specimens, collected at least 18 months apart, were tested for GBV-C RNA by reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction with primers to the NS5B gene and confirmed using E2 gene primers and sequencing. Antibodies to GBV-C E2 protein were also determined. Liver-related morbidity and mortality were assessed from patient records.

RESULTS

Fifty-seven of 158 (36%) patients had GBV-C RNA and 94 (59%) had evidence of exposure to GBV-C based on combined polymerase chain reaction and antibody results. Thirty-four (21%) patients had features of cirrhosis, with 20 having compensated and 14 having decompensated cirrhosis. Active GBV-C RNA was significantly associated with a reduction in cirrhosis, both compensated and decompensated in multivariate analysis (hazard ratio, 0.27; 95% confidence interval, 0.08-0.88; P = .03), as well as in analysis for cirrhosis-free survival vs duration of HCV infection (P = .006). No significant effect on liver-related or overall survival was observed.

CONCLUSIONS

In these HCV/HIV-coinfected patients, GBV-C RNA was associated with a significant reduction in the severity of HCV-related liver disease.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Gastroenterology, Alfred Hospital, Prahran, Victoria, Australia.No affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

18054555

Citation

Berzsenyi, Mark D., et al. "Reduction in Hepatitis C-related Liver Disease Associated With GB Virus C in Human Immunodeficiency Virus Coinfection." Gastroenterology, vol. 133, no. 6, 2007, pp. 1821-30.
Berzsenyi MD, Bowden DS, Kelly HA, et al. Reduction in hepatitis C-related liver disease associated with GB virus C in human immunodeficiency virus coinfection. Gastroenterology. 2007;133(6):1821-30.
Berzsenyi, M. D., Bowden, D. S., Kelly, H. A., Watson, K. M., Mijch, A. M., Hammond, R. A., Crowe, S. M., & Roberts, S. K. (2007). Reduction in hepatitis C-related liver disease associated with GB virus C in human immunodeficiency virus coinfection. Gastroenterology, 133(6), 1821-30.
Berzsenyi MD, et al. Reduction in Hepatitis C-related Liver Disease Associated With GB Virus C in Human Immunodeficiency Virus Coinfection. Gastroenterology. 2007;133(6):1821-30. PubMed PMID: 18054555.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Reduction in hepatitis C-related liver disease associated with GB virus C in human immunodeficiency virus coinfection. AU - Berzsenyi,Mark D, AU - Bowden,D Scott, AU - Kelly,Heath A, AU - Watson,Kerrie M, AU - Mijch,Anne M, AU - Hammond,Rachel A, AU - Crowe,Suzanne M, AU - Roberts,Stuart K, Y1 - 2007/09/05/ PY - 2006/12/22/received PY - 2007/08/16/accepted PY - 2007/12/7/pubmed PY - 2008/1/3/medline PY - 2007/12/7/entrez SP - 1821 EP - 30 JF - Gastroenterology JO - Gastroenterology VL - 133 IS - 6 N2 - BACKGROUND & AIMS: It has been reported that GB virus C infection (GBV-C) leads to improved morbidity and mortality in patients with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection. However, GBV-C has no effect on the course of liver disease in hepatitis C virus (HCV) monoinfection. The aim of the study was to determine the influence of GBV-C infection on liver disease in patients with HCV/HIV coinfection. METHODS: Data on 158 HCV/HIV patients were collected from January 1996 to October 2005. Two plasma specimens, collected at least 18 months apart, were tested for GBV-C RNA by reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction with primers to the NS5B gene and confirmed using E2 gene primers and sequencing. Antibodies to GBV-C E2 protein were also determined. Liver-related morbidity and mortality were assessed from patient records. RESULTS: Fifty-seven of 158 (36%) patients had GBV-C RNA and 94 (59%) had evidence of exposure to GBV-C based on combined polymerase chain reaction and antibody results. Thirty-four (21%) patients had features of cirrhosis, with 20 having compensated and 14 having decompensated cirrhosis. Active GBV-C RNA was significantly associated with a reduction in cirrhosis, both compensated and decompensated in multivariate analysis (hazard ratio, 0.27; 95% confidence interval, 0.08-0.88; P = .03), as well as in analysis for cirrhosis-free survival vs duration of HCV infection (P = .006). No significant effect on liver-related or overall survival was observed. CONCLUSIONS: In these HCV/HIV-coinfected patients, GBV-C RNA was associated with a significant reduction in the severity of HCV-related liver disease. SN - 1528-0012 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/18054555/Reduction_in_hepatitis_C_related_liver_disease_associated_with_GB_virus_C_in_human_immunodeficiency_virus_coinfection_ L2 - https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S0016-5085(07)01633-2 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -