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Effects of iron supplementation on attention deficit hyperactivity disorder in children.
Pediatr Neurol 2008; 38(1):20-6PN

Abstract

Iron deficiency has been suggested as a possible contributing cause of attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) in children. This present study examined the effects of iron supplementation on ADHD in children. Twenty-three nonanemic children (aged 5-8 years) with serum ferritin levels <30 ng/mL who met DSM-IV criteria for ADHD were randomized (3:1 ratio) to either oral iron (ferrous sulfate, 80 mg/day, n = 18) or placebo (n = 5) for 12 weeks. There was a progressive significant decrease in the ADHD Rating Scale after 12 weeks on iron (-11.0 +/- 13.9; P < 0.008), but not on placebo (3.0 +/- 5.7; P = 0.308). Improvement on Conners' Parent Rating Scale (P = 0.055) and Conners' Teacher Rating Scale (P = 0.076) with iron supplementation therapy failed to reach significance. The mean Clinical Global Impression-Severity significantly decreased at 12 weeks (P < 0.01) with iron, without change in the placebo group. Iron supplementation (80 mg/day) appeared to improve ADHD symptoms in children with low serum ferritin levels suggesting a need for future investigations with larger controlled trials. Iron therapy was well tolerated and effectiveness is comparable to stimulants.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Hôpital Robert Debré, Service de Psychopathologie de l'Enfant et de l'Adolescent, Paris, France. eric.konofal@rdb.aphp.frNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Randomized Controlled Trial

Language

eng

PubMed ID

18054688

Citation

Konofal, Eric, et al. "Effects of Iron Supplementation On Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder in Children." Pediatric Neurology, vol. 38, no. 1, 2008, pp. 20-6.
Konofal E, Lecendreux M, Deron J, et al. Effects of iron supplementation on attention deficit hyperactivity disorder in children. Pediatr Neurol. 2008;38(1):20-6.
Konofal, E., Lecendreux, M., Deron, J., Marchand, M., Cortese, S., Zaïm, M., ... Arnulf, I. (2008). Effects of iron supplementation on attention deficit hyperactivity disorder in children. Pediatric Neurology, 38(1), pp. 20-6.
Konofal E, et al. Effects of Iron Supplementation On Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder in Children. Pediatr Neurol. 2008;38(1):20-6. PubMed PMID: 18054688.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Effects of iron supplementation on attention deficit hyperactivity disorder in children. AU - Konofal,Eric, AU - Lecendreux,Michel, AU - Deron,Juliette, AU - Marchand,Martine, AU - Cortese,Samuele, AU - Zaïm,Mohammed, AU - Mouren,Marie Christine, AU - Arnulf,Isabelle, PY - 2007/06/12/received PY - 2007/07/03/revised PY - 2007/08/16/accepted PY - 2007/12/7/pubmed PY - 2008/2/20/medline PY - 2007/12/7/entrez SP - 20 EP - 6 JF - Pediatric neurology JO - Pediatr. Neurol. VL - 38 IS - 1 N2 - Iron deficiency has been suggested as a possible contributing cause of attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) in children. This present study examined the effects of iron supplementation on ADHD in children. Twenty-three nonanemic children (aged 5-8 years) with serum ferritin levels <30 ng/mL who met DSM-IV criteria for ADHD were randomized (3:1 ratio) to either oral iron (ferrous sulfate, 80 mg/day, n = 18) or placebo (n = 5) for 12 weeks. There was a progressive significant decrease in the ADHD Rating Scale after 12 weeks on iron (-11.0 +/- 13.9; P < 0.008), but not on placebo (3.0 +/- 5.7; P = 0.308). Improvement on Conners' Parent Rating Scale (P = 0.055) and Conners' Teacher Rating Scale (P = 0.076) with iron supplementation therapy failed to reach significance. The mean Clinical Global Impression-Severity significantly decreased at 12 weeks (P < 0.01) with iron, without change in the placebo group. Iron supplementation (80 mg/day) appeared to improve ADHD symptoms in children with low serum ferritin levels suggesting a need for future investigations with larger controlled trials. Iron therapy was well tolerated and effectiveness is comparable to stimulants. SN - 0887-8994 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/18054688/full_citation L2 - https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S0887-8994(07)00417-1 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -