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Infections in the CNS during childhood and the risk of subsequent psychotic illness: a cohort study of more than one million Swedish subjects.
Am J Psychiatry. 2008 Jan; 165(1):59-65.AJ

Abstract

OBJECTIVE

Infections during early life have been suggested to play a role in the etiology of schizophrenia. Most studies have focused on fetal life; few have explored risk associated with infection during childhood. The results of these have been inconsistent. The present study aims to investigate whether there is an increased risk of schizophrenia and other nonaffective psychoses associated with viral or bacterial CNS infections during childhood and, if so, which specific agents are involved.

METHOD

A national cohort consisting of 1.2 million children born between 1973 and 1985 was followed up by using Swedish national registers to retrieve data on hospital admissions for CNS infections at 0-12 years of age (bacterial: N=2,435, viral: N=6,550) as well as admissions for nonaffective psychotic illnesses from the 14th birthday (N=2,269).

RESULTS

There was a slightly increased risk of nonaffective psychotic illness associated with viral CNS infections, as well as schizophrenia. There was no evidence of increased risk in relation to bacterial infections. When divided into specific agents, exposures to mumps virus or cytomegalovirus were associated with subsequent psychoses.

CONCLUSIONS

Serious viral CNS infections during childhood appear to be associated with the later development of schizophrenia and nonaffective psychoses. The association with specific viruses suggests that the risk is related to infectious agents with a propensity to invade the brain parenchyma.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Psychiatric Epidemiology, EPI/Karolinska Institutet, Norrbacka pl 5, 171 76 Stockholm, Sweden. christina.dalman@sll.seNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Comparative Study
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

18056223

Citation

Dalman, Christina, et al. "Infections in the CNS During Childhood and the Risk of Subsequent Psychotic Illness: a Cohort Study of More Than One Million Swedish Subjects." The American Journal of Psychiatry, vol. 165, no. 1, 2008, pp. 59-65.
Dalman C, Allebeck P, Gunnell D, et al. Infections in the CNS during childhood and the risk of subsequent psychotic illness: a cohort study of more than one million Swedish subjects. Am J Psychiatry. 2008;165(1):59-65.
Dalman, C., Allebeck, P., Gunnell, D., Harrison, G., Kristensson, K., Lewis, G., Lofving, S., Rasmussen, F., Wicks, S., & Karlsson, H. (2008). Infections in the CNS during childhood and the risk of subsequent psychotic illness: a cohort study of more than one million Swedish subjects. The American Journal of Psychiatry, 165(1), 59-65.
Dalman C, et al. Infections in the CNS During Childhood and the Risk of Subsequent Psychotic Illness: a Cohort Study of More Than One Million Swedish Subjects. Am J Psychiatry. 2008;165(1):59-65. PubMed PMID: 18056223.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Infections in the CNS during childhood and the risk of subsequent psychotic illness: a cohort study of more than one million Swedish subjects. AU - Dalman,Christina, AU - Allebeck,Peter, AU - Gunnell,David, AU - Harrison,Glyn, AU - Kristensson,Krister, AU - Lewis,Glyn, AU - Lofving,Sofia, AU - Rasmussen,Finn, AU - Wicks,Susanne, AU - Karlsson,Håkan, Y1 - 2007/12/03/ PY - 2007/12/7/pubmed PY - 2008/2/19/medline PY - 2007/12/7/entrez SP - 59 EP - 65 JF - The American journal of psychiatry JO - Am J Psychiatry VL - 165 IS - 1 N2 - OBJECTIVE: Infections during early life have been suggested to play a role in the etiology of schizophrenia. Most studies have focused on fetal life; few have explored risk associated with infection during childhood. The results of these have been inconsistent. The present study aims to investigate whether there is an increased risk of schizophrenia and other nonaffective psychoses associated with viral or bacterial CNS infections during childhood and, if so, which specific agents are involved. METHOD: A national cohort consisting of 1.2 million children born between 1973 and 1985 was followed up by using Swedish national registers to retrieve data on hospital admissions for CNS infections at 0-12 years of age (bacterial: N=2,435, viral: N=6,550) as well as admissions for nonaffective psychotic illnesses from the 14th birthday (N=2,269). RESULTS: There was a slightly increased risk of nonaffective psychotic illness associated with viral CNS infections, as well as schizophrenia. There was no evidence of increased risk in relation to bacterial infections. When divided into specific agents, exposures to mumps virus or cytomegalovirus were associated with subsequent psychoses. CONCLUSIONS: Serious viral CNS infections during childhood appear to be associated with the later development of schizophrenia and nonaffective psychoses. The association with specific viruses suggests that the risk is related to infectious agents with a propensity to invade the brain parenchyma. SN - 0002-953X UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/18056223/Infections_in_the_CNS_during_childhood_and_the_risk_of_subsequent_psychotic_illness:_a_cohort_study_of_more_than_one_million_Swedish_subjects_ L2 - https://ajp.psychiatryonline.org/doi/10.1176/appi.ajp.2007.07050740?url_ver=Z39.88-2003&rfr_id=ori:rid:crossref.org&rfr_dat=cr_pub=pubmed DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -