Tags

Type your tag names separated by a space and hit enter

Quality medical homes: meeting children's needs for therapeutic and supportive services.
Pediatrics. 2008 Jan; 121(1):e127-34.Ped

Abstract

OBJECTIVE

The objective of this study was to determine whether the quality of a medical home is associated with access to needed therapeutic and supportive services among children with special health care needs.

METHODS

Data from the 2000-2001 National Survey of Children With Special Health Care Needs were used in the analysis. The primary group of interest was children who were 0 to 17 years of age and needed therapeutic (n = 15,793) or supportive (n = 23,376) services. For each characteristic of a quality medical home, the percentage of children who needed and received therapeutic and supportive services was generated. Logistic regression was used to control for covariates while modeling the association between overall quality of a child's medical home and having unmet needs for therapeutic or supportive services.

RESULTS

Of all children identified as needing services, 16.2% had unmet therapeutic and 9.8% unmet supportive service needs. Only 23.9% of the children who needed therapeutic and 32.5% of children who needed supportive services met the criteria of having a quality medical home. High-quality care within medical homes was associated with a decreased likelihood of having unmet needs for therapeutic and supportive services. Each characteristic of a quality medical home was associated with unmet need, as were severity of the child's condition, family income of <200% of the federal poverty level, underinsurance, and maternal education beyond high school.

CONCLUSIONS

Among other factors, having a poor-quality medical home seems to be a barrier to receiving needed therapeutic or supportive services for children with special health care needs. Efforts on the part of pediatricians to establish quality medical homes for all children could have the added benefit of facilitating access to needed therapeutic and supportive services and promoting the health and well-being of children with special health care needs and their families.

Authors+Show Affiliations

University of Wisconsin, Department of Kinesiology, Program in Occupational Therapy, 3170 Medical Science Center, 1300 University Ave, Madison, WI 53706-1532, USA. rbenedict@education.wisc.edu

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

18056291

Citation

Benedict, Ruth E.. "Quality Medical Homes: Meeting Children's Needs for Therapeutic and Supportive Services." Pediatrics, vol. 121, no. 1, 2008, pp. e127-34.
Benedict RE. Quality medical homes: meeting children's needs for therapeutic and supportive services. Pediatrics. 2008;121(1):e127-34.
Benedict, R. E. (2008). Quality medical homes: meeting children's needs for therapeutic and supportive services. Pediatrics, 121(1), e127-34.
Benedict RE. Quality Medical Homes: Meeting Children's Needs for Therapeutic and Supportive Services. Pediatrics. 2008;121(1):e127-34. PubMed PMID: 18056291.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Quality medical homes: meeting children's needs for therapeutic and supportive services. A1 - Benedict,Ruth E, Y1 - 2007/12/03/ PY - 2007/12/7/pubmed PY - 2008/2/6/medline PY - 2007/12/7/entrez SP - e127 EP - 34 JF - Pediatrics JO - Pediatrics VL - 121 IS - 1 N2 - OBJECTIVE: The objective of this study was to determine whether the quality of a medical home is associated with access to needed therapeutic and supportive services among children with special health care needs. METHODS: Data from the 2000-2001 National Survey of Children With Special Health Care Needs were used in the analysis. The primary group of interest was children who were 0 to 17 years of age and needed therapeutic (n = 15,793) or supportive (n = 23,376) services. For each characteristic of a quality medical home, the percentage of children who needed and received therapeutic and supportive services was generated. Logistic regression was used to control for covariates while modeling the association between overall quality of a child's medical home and having unmet needs for therapeutic or supportive services. RESULTS: Of all children identified as needing services, 16.2% had unmet therapeutic and 9.8% unmet supportive service needs. Only 23.9% of the children who needed therapeutic and 32.5% of children who needed supportive services met the criteria of having a quality medical home. High-quality care within medical homes was associated with a decreased likelihood of having unmet needs for therapeutic and supportive services. Each characteristic of a quality medical home was associated with unmet need, as were severity of the child's condition, family income of <200% of the federal poverty level, underinsurance, and maternal education beyond high school. CONCLUSIONS: Among other factors, having a poor-quality medical home seems to be a barrier to receiving needed therapeutic or supportive services for children with special health care needs. Efforts on the part of pediatricians to establish quality medical homes for all children could have the added benefit of facilitating access to needed therapeutic and supportive services and promoting the health and well-being of children with special health care needs and their families. SN - 1098-4275 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/18056291/Quality_medical_homes:_meeting_children's_needs_for_therapeutic_and_supportive_services_ L2 - http://pediatrics.aappublications.org/cgi/pmidlookup?view=long&amp;pmid=18056291 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -