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Accuracy of adolescent self-report of height and weight in assessing overweight status: a literature review.
Arch Pediatr Adolesc Med. 2007 Dec; 161(12):1154-61.AP

Abstract

OBJECTIVE

To examine the accuracy of self-reported height and weight data to classify adolescent overweight status. Self-reported height and weight are commonly used with minimal consideration of accuracy.

DATA SOURCES

Eleven studies (4 nationally representative, 7 convenience sample or locally based).

STUDY SELECTION

Peer-reviewed articles of studies conducted in the United States that compared self-reported and directly measured height, weight, and/or body mass index data to classify overweight among adolescents.

MAIN EXPOSURES

Self-reported and directly measured height and weight.

MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES

Overweight prevalence; missing data, bias, and accuracy.

RESULTS

Studies varied in examination of bias. Sensitivity of self-reported data for classification of overweight ranged from 55% to 76% (4 of 4 studies). Overweight prevalence was -0.4% to -17.7% lower when body mass index was based on self-reported data vs directly measured data (5 of 5 studies). Females underestimated weight more than males (ranges, -4.0 to -1.0 kg vs -2.6 to 1.5 kg, respectively) (9 of 9 studies); overweight individuals underestimated weight more than nonoverweight individuals (6 of 6 studies). Missing self-reported data ranged from 0% to 23% (9 of 9 studies). There was inadequate information on bias by age and race/ethnicity.

CONCLUSIONS

Self-reported data are valuable if the only source of data. However, self-reported data underestimate overweight prevalence and there is bias by sex and weight status. Lower sensitivities of self-reported data indicate that one-fourth to one-half of those overweight would be missed. Other potential biases in self-reported data, such as across subgroups, need further clarification. The feasibility of collecting directly measured height and weight data on a state/community level should be explored because directly measured data are more accurate.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Maternal Child Nutrition Branch, Division of Nutrition and Physical Activity, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Atlanta, Georgia 30341, USA. bsherry@cdc.govNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Review

Language

eng

PubMed ID

18056560

Citation

Sherry, Bettylou, et al. "Accuracy of Adolescent Self-report of Height and Weight in Assessing Overweight Status: a Literature Review." Archives of Pediatrics & Adolescent Medicine, vol. 161, no. 12, 2007, pp. 1154-61.
Sherry B, Jefferds ME, Grummer-Strawn LM. Accuracy of adolescent self-report of height and weight in assessing overweight status: a literature review. Arch Pediatr Adolesc Med. 2007;161(12):1154-61.
Sherry, B., Jefferds, M. E., & Grummer-Strawn, L. M. (2007). Accuracy of adolescent self-report of height and weight in assessing overweight status: a literature review. Archives of Pediatrics & Adolescent Medicine, 161(12), 1154-61.
Sherry B, Jefferds ME, Grummer-Strawn LM. Accuracy of Adolescent Self-report of Height and Weight in Assessing Overweight Status: a Literature Review. Arch Pediatr Adolesc Med. 2007;161(12):1154-61. PubMed PMID: 18056560.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Accuracy of adolescent self-report of height and weight in assessing overweight status: a literature review. AU - Sherry,Bettylou, AU - Jefferds,Maria Elena, AU - Grummer-Strawn,Laurence M, PY - 2007/12/7/pubmed PY - 2008/1/18/medline PY - 2007/12/7/entrez SP - 1154 EP - 61 JF - Archives of pediatrics & adolescent medicine JO - Arch Pediatr Adolesc Med VL - 161 IS - 12 N2 - OBJECTIVE: To examine the accuracy of self-reported height and weight data to classify adolescent overweight status. Self-reported height and weight are commonly used with minimal consideration of accuracy. DATA SOURCES: Eleven studies (4 nationally representative, 7 convenience sample or locally based). STUDY SELECTION: Peer-reviewed articles of studies conducted in the United States that compared self-reported and directly measured height, weight, and/or body mass index data to classify overweight among adolescents. MAIN EXPOSURES: Self-reported and directly measured height and weight. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: Overweight prevalence; missing data, bias, and accuracy. RESULTS: Studies varied in examination of bias. Sensitivity of self-reported data for classification of overweight ranged from 55% to 76% (4 of 4 studies). Overweight prevalence was -0.4% to -17.7% lower when body mass index was based on self-reported data vs directly measured data (5 of 5 studies). Females underestimated weight more than males (ranges, -4.0 to -1.0 kg vs -2.6 to 1.5 kg, respectively) (9 of 9 studies); overweight individuals underestimated weight more than nonoverweight individuals (6 of 6 studies). Missing self-reported data ranged from 0% to 23% (9 of 9 studies). There was inadequate information on bias by age and race/ethnicity. CONCLUSIONS: Self-reported data are valuable if the only source of data. However, self-reported data underestimate overweight prevalence and there is bias by sex and weight status. Lower sensitivities of self-reported data indicate that one-fourth to one-half of those overweight would be missed. Other potential biases in self-reported data, such as across subgroups, need further clarification. The feasibility of collecting directly measured height and weight data on a state/community level should be explored because directly measured data are more accurate. SN - 1538-3628 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/18056560/Accuracy_of_adolescent_self_report_of_height_and_weight_in_assessing_overweight_status:_a_literature_review_ L2 - https://jamanetwork.com/journals/jamapediatrics/fullarticle/10.1001/archpedi.161.12.1154 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -