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Appropriateness of current thresholds for obesity-related measures among Aboriginal people.
CMAJ. 2007 Dec 04; 177(12):1499-505.CMAJ

Abstract

BACKGROUND

Despite the high prevalence of obesity and diabetes in the Canadian Aboriginal population, it is unknown whether the current thresholds for body mass index and waist circumference derived from white populations are appropriate for Aboriginal people. We compared the risk of cardiovascular disease among Canadian Aboriginal and European populations using the current thresholds for body mass index and waist circumference.

METHODS

Healthy Aboriginal (n = 195) and European (n = 201) participants (matched for sex and body mass index range) were assessed for demographic characteristics, lifestyle factors, total and central adiposity and risk factors for cardiovascular disease. Among Aboriginal and European participants, we compared the relation between body mass index and each of the following 3 factors: percent body fat, central adiposity and cardiovascular disease risk factors. We also compared the relation between waist circumference and the same 3 factors.

RESULTS

The use of body mass index underestimated percent body fat by 1.3% among Aboriginal participants compared with European participants (p = 0.025). The use of waist circumference overestimated abdominal adipose tissue by 26.7 cm2 among Aboriginal participants compared with European participants (p = 0.007). However, there was no difference in how waist circumference estimated subcutaneous abdominal and visceral adipose tissue among the 2 groups. At the same body mass index and waist circumference, we observed no differences in the majority of cardiovascular disease risk factors among Aboriginal and European participants. The prevalence of dyslipidemia, hypertension, impaired fasting glucose and metabolic syndrome was similar among participants in the 2 groups after adjustment for body mass index, waist circumference, age and sex.

INTERPRETATION

We found no difference in the relation between body mass index and risk of cardiovascular disease between men and women of Aboriginal and European descent. We also found no difference between waist circumference and cardiovascular disease risk among these groups. These data support the use of current anthropometric thresholds in the Canadian Aboriginal population.

Authors+Show Affiliations

School of Kinesiology, Simon Fraser University, Burnaby, BC. slear@providencehealth.bc.caNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Comparative Study
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

18056598

Citation

Lear, Scott A., et al. "Appropriateness of Current Thresholds for Obesity-related Measures Among Aboriginal People." CMAJ : Canadian Medical Association Journal = Journal De l'Association Medicale Canadienne, vol. 177, no. 12, 2007, pp. 1499-505.
Lear SA, Humphries KH, Frohlich JJ, et al. Appropriateness of current thresholds for obesity-related measures among Aboriginal people. CMAJ. 2007;177(12):1499-505.
Lear, S. A., Humphries, K. H., Frohlich, J. J., & Birmingham, C. L. (2007). Appropriateness of current thresholds for obesity-related measures among Aboriginal people. CMAJ : Canadian Medical Association Journal = Journal De l'Association Medicale Canadienne, 177(12), 1499-505.
Lear SA, et al. Appropriateness of Current Thresholds for Obesity-related Measures Among Aboriginal People. CMAJ. 2007 Dec 4;177(12):1499-505. PubMed PMID: 18056598.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Appropriateness of current thresholds for obesity-related measures among Aboriginal people. AU - Lear,Scott A, AU - Humphries,Karin H, AU - Frohlich,Jiri J, AU - Birmingham,C Laird, PY - 2007/12/7/pubmed PY - 2008/1/16/medline PY - 2007/12/7/entrez SP - 1499 EP - 505 JF - CMAJ : Canadian Medical Association journal = journal de l'Association medicale canadienne JO - CMAJ VL - 177 IS - 12 N2 - BACKGROUND: Despite the high prevalence of obesity and diabetes in the Canadian Aboriginal population, it is unknown whether the current thresholds for body mass index and waist circumference derived from white populations are appropriate for Aboriginal people. We compared the risk of cardiovascular disease among Canadian Aboriginal and European populations using the current thresholds for body mass index and waist circumference. METHODS: Healthy Aboriginal (n = 195) and European (n = 201) participants (matched for sex and body mass index range) were assessed for demographic characteristics, lifestyle factors, total and central adiposity and risk factors for cardiovascular disease. Among Aboriginal and European participants, we compared the relation between body mass index and each of the following 3 factors: percent body fat, central adiposity and cardiovascular disease risk factors. We also compared the relation between waist circumference and the same 3 factors. RESULTS: The use of body mass index underestimated percent body fat by 1.3% among Aboriginal participants compared with European participants (p = 0.025). The use of waist circumference overestimated abdominal adipose tissue by 26.7 cm2 among Aboriginal participants compared with European participants (p = 0.007). However, there was no difference in how waist circumference estimated subcutaneous abdominal and visceral adipose tissue among the 2 groups. At the same body mass index and waist circumference, we observed no differences in the majority of cardiovascular disease risk factors among Aboriginal and European participants. The prevalence of dyslipidemia, hypertension, impaired fasting glucose and metabolic syndrome was similar among participants in the 2 groups after adjustment for body mass index, waist circumference, age and sex. INTERPRETATION: We found no difference in the relation between body mass index and risk of cardiovascular disease between men and women of Aboriginal and European descent. We also found no difference between waist circumference and cardiovascular disease risk among these groups. These data support the use of current anthropometric thresholds in the Canadian Aboriginal population. SN - 1488-2329 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/18056598/Appropriateness_of_current_thresholds_for_obesity_related_measures_among_Aboriginal_people_ L2 - http://www.cmaj.ca/cgi/pmidlookup?view=long&pmid=18056598 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -