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Weight change and cancer risk in a cohort of more than 65,000 adults in Austria.
Ann Oncol. 2008 Apr; 19(4):641-8.AO

Abstract

BACKGROUND

To investigate relations between weight loss or weight gain and the incidence of cancer.

PATIENTS AND METHODS

Weight change was assessed in a population-based cohort of >65 000 Austrian adults (28 711 men and 36 938 women) for a period of 7 years, after which participants were followed for incident cancers over 8 years on average. Incident cancers (other than nonmelanoma skin cancers) were ascertained by a population-based cancer registry (n = 3128). Cox proportional hazards models were used to estimate hazard rate ratios (HRs) stratified by age and adjusted for smoking, occupational group, blood glucose and body mass index at baseline.

RESULTS

In both men and women, neither weight loss nor weight gain was clearly associated with the incidence of all cancers combined. Weight loss (>0.10 kg/m(2)/year) was inversely associated with colon cancer in men [HR 0.50; 95% confidence interval (CI) 0.29-0.87], while high weight gain (> or =0.50 kg/m(2)/year) was inversely associated with prostate cancer (HR 0.43; 95% CI 0.24-0.76). Among women, high weight gain was positively associated with ovarian cancer (HR 2.48; 95% CI 1.05-5.85).

CONCLUSION

These findings indicate that recent weight change may influence the incidence of several types of cancer.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Institute of Epidemiology, University of Ulm, Helmholtzstrasse, Germany. kilian.rapp@uni-ulm.deNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

18056917

Citation

Rapp, K, et al. "Weight Change and Cancer Risk in a Cohort of More Than 65,000 Adults in Austria." Annals of Oncology : Official Journal of the European Society for Medical Oncology, vol. 19, no. 4, 2008, pp. 641-8.
Rapp K, Klenk J, Ulmer H, et al. Weight change and cancer risk in a cohort of more than 65,000 adults in Austria. Ann Oncol. 2008;19(4):641-8.
Rapp, K., Klenk, J., Ulmer, H., Concin, H., Diem, G., Oberaigner, W., & Schroeder, J. (2008). Weight change and cancer risk in a cohort of more than 65,000 adults in Austria. Annals of Oncology : Official Journal of the European Society for Medical Oncology, 19(4), 641-8.
Rapp K, et al. Weight Change and Cancer Risk in a Cohort of More Than 65,000 Adults in Austria. Ann Oncol. 2008;19(4):641-8. PubMed PMID: 18056917.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Weight change and cancer risk in a cohort of more than 65,000 adults in Austria. AU - Rapp,K, AU - Klenk,J, AU - Ulmer,H, AU - Concin,H, AU - Diem,G, AU - Oberaigner,W, AU - Schroeder,J, Y1 - 2007/12/04/ PY - 2007/12/7/pubmed PY - 2008/4/17/medline PY - 2007/12/7/entrez SP - 641 EP - 8 JF - Annals of oncology : official journal of the European Society for Medical Oncology JO - Ann. Oncol. VL - 19 IS - 4 N2 - BACKGROUND: To investigate relations between weight loss or weight gain and the incidence of cancer. PATIENTS AND METHODS: Weight change was assessed in a population-based cohort of >65 000 Austrian adults (28 711 men and 36 938 women) for a period of 7 years, after which participants were followed for incident cancers over 8 years on average. Incident cancers (other than nonmelanoma skin cancers) were ascertained by a population-based cancer registry (n = 3128). Cox proportional hazards models were used to estimate hazard rate ratios (HRs) stratified by age and adjusted for smoking, occupational group, blood glucose and body mass index at baseline. RESULTS: In both men and women, neither weight loss nor weight gain was clearly associated with the incidence of all cancers combined. Weight loss (>0.10 kg/m(2)/year) was inversely associated with colon cancer in men [HR 0.50; 95% confidence interval (CI) 0.29-0.87], while high weight gain (> or =0.50 kg/m(2)/year) was inversely associated with prostate cancer (HR 0.43; 95% CI 0.24-0.76). Among women, high weight gain was positively associated with ovarian cancer (HR 2.48; 95% CI 1.05-5.85). CONCLUSION: These findings indicate that recent weight change may influence the incidence of several types of cancer. SN - 1569-8041 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/18056917/Weight_change_and_cancer_risk_in_a_cohort_of_more_than_65000_adults_in_Austria_ L2 - https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S0923-7534(19)41452-X DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -