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Medical co-morbidity in depressive disorders.
Ann Clin Psychiatry 2007 Oct-Dec; 19(4):289-303AC

Abstract

BACKGROUND

Depression is much more prevalent among those with chronic medical conditions compared to the general population of the United States. Depression is recognized as a cause of increased morbidity and mortality and has been associated with higher health care costs, adverse health behaviors, significant functional impairment, lost work productivity, occupational disability and increased health care utilization.

METHOD

Searches of Medline, OVIDMedline, PubMed and PsycINFO of all English-language articles published between 1966 and 2007 were conducted using the keywords mood disorders, medical comorbidity, depression, antidepressant therapy. Supplemental references were manually extracted from relevant articles and chapters. Reviews of mechanistic studies and open label and randomized controlled trials of depression in patients with medical co morbidities were reviewed.

RESULTS

Depressive disorders are prevalent among the medically ill and the relationship between depression and medical illness may be bidirectional. Antidepressant medications are effective in the treatment of depression in the medically ill.

CONCLUSIONS

Depressive disorders can adversely impact the course of medical illnesses. Available antidepressant treatments are effective for the treatment of depression in the medically ill. Early identification and treatment of depression in medical illness can positively influence medical outcomes and quality of life.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Psychiatry, University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine and The Children's Hospital of Philadelphia, Behavioral Health Center, Philadelphia, PA 19104, USA. Bentont@email.chop.eduNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Review

Language

eng

PubMed ID

18058286

Citation

Benton, Tami, et al. "Medical Co-morbidity in Depressive Disorders." Annals of Clinical Psychiatry : Official Journal of the American Academy of Clinical Psychiatrists, vol. 19, no. 4, 2007, pp. 289-303.
Benton T, Staab J, Evans DL. Medical co-morbidity in depressive disorders. Ann Clin Psychiatry. 2007;19(4):289-303.
Benton, T., Staab, J., & Evans, D. L. (2007). Medical co-morbidity in depressive disorders. Annals of Clinical Psychiatry : Official Journal of the American Academy of Clinical Psychiatrists, 19(4), pp. 289-303.
Benton T, Staab J, Evans DL. Medical Co-morbidity in Depressive Disorders. Ann Clin Psychiatry. 2007;19(4):289-303. PubMed PMID: 18058286.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Medical co-morbidity in depressive disorders. AU - Benton,Tami, AU - Staab,Jeffrey, AU - Evans,Dwight L, PY - 2007/12/7/pubmed PY - 2008/1/8/medline PY - 2007/12/7/entrez SP - 289 EP - 303 JF - Annals of clinical psychiatry : official journal of the American Academy of Clinical Psychiatrists JO - Ann Clin Psychiatry VL - 19 IS - 4 N2 - BACKGROUND: Depression is much more prevalent among those with chronic medical conditions compared to the general population of the United States. Depression is recognized as a cause of increased morbidity and mortality and has been associated with higher health care costs, adverse health behaviors, significant functional impairment, lost work productivity, occupational disability and increased health care utilization. METHOD: Searches of Medline, OVIDMedline, PubMed and PsycINFO of all English-language articles published between 1966 and 2007 were conducted using the keywords mood disorders, medical comorbidity, depression, antidepressant therapy. Supplemental references were manually extracted from relevant articles and chapters. Reviews of mechanistic studies and open label and randomized controlled trials of depression in patients with medical co morbidities were reviewed. RESULTS: Depressive disorders are prevalent among the medically ill and the relationship between depression and medical illness may be bidirectional. Antidepressant medications are effective in the treatment of depression in the medically ill. CONCLUSIONS: Depressive disorders can adversely impact the course of medical illnesses. Available antidepressant treatments are effective for the treatment of depression in the medically ill. Early identification and treatment of depression in medical illness can positively influence medical outcomes and quality of life. SN - 1547-3325 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/18058286/Medical_co_morbidity_in_depressive_disorders_ L2 - http://hivinsite.ucsf.edu/InSite?page=kb-04-01-06 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -