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Breastfeeding and health outcomes among citizen infants of immigrant mothers.
J Am Diet Assoc 2007; 107(12):2077-86JA

Abstract

OBJECTIVE

To examine the associations between breastfeeding and child health outcomes among citizen infants of mothers immigrant to the United States.

DESIGN/METHODS

From September 1998 through June 2004, as part of the Children's Sentinel Nutrition Assessment Program, a sentinel sample of 3,592 immigrant mothers with infants aged 0 to 12 months were interviewed in emergency departments or pediatric clinics in six sites. Mothers reported breastfeeding history, child health history, household demographics, government assistance program participation, and household food security. Infants' weight and length were recorded at the time of visit. Bivariate analyses identified confounders associated with breastfeeding and outcomes, which were controlled in logistic regression. Additional logistic regressions examined whether food insecurity modified the relationship between breastfeeding and child outcomes.

RESULTS

Eighty-three percent of infants of immigrants initiated breastfeeding. Thirty-six percent of immigrant households reported household food insecurity. After controlling for potential confounding variables, breastfed infants of immigrant mothers were less likely to be reported in fair/poor health (adjusted odds ratio [AOR] 0.65, 95% confidence interval [CI] 0.50 to 0.85; P=0.001) and less likely to have a history of hospitalizations (AOR 0.72, CI 0.56 to 0.93, P=0.01), compared to nonbreastfed infants of immigrant mothers. Compared to nonbreastfed infants, the breastfed infants had significantly greater weight-for-age z scores (0.185 vs 0.024; P=0.006) and length-for-age z scores (0.144 vs -0.164; P<0.0001), but there was no significant difference in risk of overweight (weight-for-age >95th percentile or weight-for-length >90th percentile) between the two groups (AOR 0.94, CI 0.73 to 1.21; P=0.63). Household food insecurity modified the association between breastfeeding and child health status, such that the associations between breastfeeding and child health were strongest among food-insecure households.

CONCLUSIONS

Breastfeeding is associated with improved health outcomes for infants of immigrant mothers. Breastfeeding is an optimal strategy in the first year of life to improve all infants' health and growth, especially for children of immigrants who are at greater risk for experiencing food insecurity.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Johns Hopkins School of Public Health, Center for American Indian Health, Albuquerque, NM 87102, USA. nneault@jsph.eduNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Multicenter Study
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

18060893

Citation

Neault, Nicole B., et al. "Breastfeeding and Health Outcomes Among Citizen Infants of Immigrant Mothers." Journal of the American Dietetic Association, vol. 107, no. 12, 2007, pp. 2077-86.
Neault NB, Frank DA, Merewood A, et al. Breastfeeding and health outcomes among citizen infants of immigrant mothers. J Am Diet Assoc. 2007;107(12):2077-86.
Neault, N. B., Frank, D. A., Merewood, A., Philipp, B., Levenson, S., Cook, J. T., ... Berkowitz, C. (2007). Breastfeeding and health outcomes among citizen infants of immigrant mothers. Journal of the American Dietetic Association, 107(12), pp. 2077-86.
Neault NB, et al. Breastfeeding and Health Outcomes Among Citizen Infants of Immigrant Mothers. J Am Diet Assoc. 2007;107(12):2077-86. PubMed PMID: 18060893.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Breastfeeding and health outcomes among citizen infants of immigrant mothers. AU - Neault,Nicole B, AU - Frank,Deborah A, AU - Merewood,Anne, AU - Philipp,Barbara, AU - Levenson,Suzette, AU - Cook,John T, AU - Meyers,Alan F, AU - Casey,Patrick H, AU - Cutts,Diana B, AU - Black,Maureen M, AU - Heeren,Timothy, AU - Berkowitz,Carol, AU - ,, PY - 2007/02/28/received PY - 2007/12/7/pubmed PY - 2008/1/30/medline PY - 2007/12/7/entrez SP - 2077 EP - 86 JF - Journal of the American Dietetic Association JO - J Am Diet Assoc VL - 107 IS - 12 N2 - OBJECTIVE: To examine the associations between breastfeeding and child health outcomes among citizen infants of mothers immigrant to the United States. DESIGN/METHODS: From September 1998 through June 2004, as part of the Children's Sentinel Nutrition Assessment Program, a sentinel sample of 3,592 immigrant mothers with infants aged 0 to 12 months were interviewed in emergency departments or pediatric clinics in six sites. Mothers reported breastfeeding history, child health history, household demographics, government assistance program participation, and household food security. Infants' weight and length were recorded at the time of visit. Bivariate analyses identified confounders associated with breastfeeding and outcomes, which were controlled in logistic regression. Additional logistic regressions examined whether food insecurity modified the relationship between breastfeeding and child outcomes. RESULTS: Eighty-three percent of infants of immigrants initiated breastfeeding. Thirty-six percent of immigrant households reported household food insecurity. After controlling for potential confounding variables, breastfed infants of immigrant mothers were less likely to be reported in fair/poor health (adjusted odds ratio [AOR] 0.65, 95% confidence interval [CI] 0.50 to 0.85; P=0.001) and less likely to have a history of hospitalizations (AOR 0.72, CI 0.56 to 0.93, P=0.01), compared to nonbreastfed infants of immigrant mothers. Compared to nonbreastfed infants, the breastfed infants had significantly greater weight-for-age z scores (0.185 vs 0.024; P=0.006) and length-for-age z scores (0.144 vs -0.164; P<0.0001), but there was no significant difference in risk of overweight (weight-for-age >95th percentile or weight-for-length >90th percentile) between the two groups (AOR 0.94, CI 0.73 to 1.21; P=0.63). Household food insecurity modified the association between breastfeeding and child health status, such that the associations between breastfeeding and child health were strongest among food-insecure households. CONCLUSIONS: Breastfeeding is associated with improved health outcomes for infants of immigrant mothers. Breastfeeding is an optimal strategy in the first year of life to improve all infants' health and growth, especially for children of immigrants who are at greater risk for experiencing food insecurity. SN - 0002-8223 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/18060893/Breastfeeding_and_health_outcomes_among_citizen_infants_of_immigrant_mothers_ L2 - https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S0002-8223(07)01801-9 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -