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Nutrient status of adults with cystic fibrosis.
J Am Diet Assoc 2007; 107(12):2114-9JA

Abstract

Nutrition is thought to influence disease status in patients with cystic fibrosis (CF). This cross-sectional study sought to evaluate nutrient intake and anthropometric data from 64 adult outpatients with cystic fibrosis. Nutrient intake from food and supplements was compared with the Dietary Reference Intakes for 16 nutrients and outcomes influenced by nutritional status. Attention was given to vitamin D and calcium given potential skeletal implications due to cystic fibrosis. Measurements included weight, height, body composition, pulmonary function, and serum metabolic parameters. Participants were interviewed about dietary intake, supplement use, pulmonary function, sunlight exposure, and pain. The participants' mean body mass index (+/-standard deviation) was 21.8+/-4.9 and pulmonary function tests were normal. Seventy-eight percent used pancreatic enzyme replacement for malabsorption. Vitamin D deficiency [25-hydroxyvitamin D (25OHD)<37.5 nmol/L] was common: 25 (39%) were deficient despite adequate vitamin D intake. Lipid profiles were normal in the majority, even though total and saturated fat consumption represented 33.0% and 16.8% of energy intake, respectively. Reported protein intake represented 16.9% of total energy intake (range 10%-25%). For several nutrients, including vitamin D and calcium, intake from food and supplements in many participants exceeded recommended Tolerable Upper Intake Levels. Among adults with cystic fibrosis, vitamin D deficiency was common despite reported adequate intake, and lipid profiles were normal despite a relatively high fat intake. Mean protein consumption was adequate, but the range of intake was concerning, as both inadequate or excessive intake may have deleterious skeletal effects. These findings call into question the applicability of established nutrient thresholds for patients with cystic fibrosis.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Division of Endocrinology, Children's Hospital Boston, Boston, MA 22015, USA. catherine.gordon@childrens.harvard.eduNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Comparative Study
Journal Article
Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural

Language

eng

PubMed ID

18060897

Citation

Gordon, Catherine M., et al. "Nutrient Status of Adults With Cystic Fibrosis." Journal of the American Dietetic Association, vol. 107, no. 12, 2007, pp. 2114-9.
Gordon CM, Anderson EJ, Herlyn K, et al. Nutrient status of adults with cystic fibrosis. J Am Diet Assoc. 2007;107(12):2114-9.
Gordon, C. M., Anderson, E. J., Herlyn, K., Hubbard, J. L., Pizzo, A., Gelbard, R., ... Merkel, P. A. (2007). Nutrient status of adults with cystic fibrosis. Journal of the American Dietetic Association, 107(12), pp. 2114-9.
Gordon CM, et al. Nutrient Status of Adults With Cystic Fibrosis. J Am Diet Assoc. 2007;107(12):2114-9. PubMed PMID: 18060897.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Nutrient status of adults with cystic fibrosis. AU - Gordon,Catherine M, AU - Anderson,Ellen J, AU - Herlyn,Karen, AU - Hubbard,Jane L, AU - Pizzo,Angela, AU - Gelbard,Rondi, AU - Lapey,Allen, AU - Merkel,Peter A, PY - 2006/09/11/received PY - 2007/12/7/pubmed PY - 2008/1/30/medline PY - 2007/12/7/entrez SP - 2114 EP - 9 JF - Journal of the American Dietetic Association JO - J Am Diet Assoc VL - 107 IS - 12 N2 - Nutrition is thought to influence disease status in patients with cystic fibrosis (CF). This cross-sectional study sought to evaluate nutrient intake and anthropometric data from 64 adult outpatients with cystic fibrosis. Nutrient intake from food and supplements was compared with the Dietary Reference Intakes for 16 nutrients and outcomes influenced by nutritional status. Attention was given to vitamin D and calcium given potential skeletal implications due to cystic fibrosis. Measurements included weight, height, body composition, pulmonary function, and serum metabolic parameters. Participants were interviewed about dietary intake, supplement use, pulmonary function, sunlight exposure, and pain. The participants' mean body mass index (+/-standard deviation) was 21.8+/-4.9 and pulmonary function tests were normal. Seventy-eight percent used pancreatic enzyme replacement for malabsorption. Vitamin D deficiency [25-hydroxyvitamin D (25OHD)<37.5 nmol/L] was common: 25 (39%) were deficient despite adequate vitamin D intake. Lipid profiles were normal in the majority, even though total and saturated fat consumption represented 33.0% and 16.8% of energy intake, respectively. Reported protein intake represented 16.9% of total energy intake (range 10%-25%). For several nutrients, including vitamin D and calcium, intake from food and supplements in many participants exceeded recommended Tolerable Upper Intake Levels. Among adults with cystic fibrosis, vitamin D deficiency was common despite reported adequate intake, and lipid profiles were normal despite a relatively high fat intake. Mean protein consumption was adequate, but the range of intake was concerning, as both inadequate or excessive intake may have deleterious skeletal effects. These findings call into question the applicability of established nutrient thresholds for patients with cystic fibrosis. SN - 0002-8223 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/18060897/Nutrient_status_of_adults_with_cystic_fibrosis_ L2 - https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S0002-8223(07)01796-8 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -