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Perception of simulated driving performance after sleep restriction and caffeine.
J Psychosom Res 2007; 63(6):573-7JP

Abstract

OBJECTIVE

As feelings of alertness are reported to be highly correlated with performance perception, the objective of this study was to determine whether caffeine, a common countermeasure to driver sleepiness, affected a sleepy driver's ability to monitor his or her simulated driving performance.

METHODS

Twelve healthy young adults (six males, six females) participated in three counterbalanced, blinded, daytime conditions: control [9 h time in bed (TIB)], 100 mg caffeine (4 h TIB), and placebo (4 h TIB). Driving performance was measured through lane drift on a series of 30-min simulated driving sessions. Subjective sleepiness and perception of driving performance were measured at 5-min intervals during driving sessions via the Karolinska Sleepiness Scale and a corresponding perception scale.

RESULTS

Sleep restriction had a significant detrimental effect on driving performance and subjective measures. Caffeine resulted in significant improvements across all measures. Subjective measures were found to be significantly correlated after sleep restriction and prior to caffeine. Correlations between actual and perceived performance were nonsignificant across all conditions.

CONCLUSIONS

The strong correlation between subjective measures supports the postulation that sleepiness is used as a cue for performance prediction when sleep restricted. The relationship between perceived and actual performance after fatigue countermeasures remains inconclusive. Further research, addressing limitations, is needed.

Authors+Show Affiliations

School of Psychology, Centre for Sleep Research, University of South Australia, Adelaide, Australia. sarah.biggs@adelaide.edu.auNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

18061746

Citation

Biggs, Sarah N., et al. "Perception of Simulated Driving Performance After Sleep Restriction and Caffeine." Journal of Psychosomatic Research, vol. 63, no. 6, 2007, pp. 573-7.
Biggs SN, Smith A, Dorrian J, et al. Perception of simulated driving performance after sleep restriction and caffeine. J Psychosom Res. 2007;63(6):573-7.
Biggs, S. N., Smith, A., Dorrian, J., Reid, K., Dawson, D., van den Heuvel, C., & Baulk, S. (2007). Perception of simulated driving performance after sleep restriction and caffeine. Journal of Psychosomatic Research, 63(6), pp. 573-7.
Biggs SN, et al. Perception of Simulated Driving Performance After Sleep Restriction and Caffeine. J Psychosom Res. 2007;63(6):573-7. PubMed PMID: 18061746.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Perception of simulated driving performance after sleep restriction and caffeine. AU - Biggs,Sarah N, AU - Smith,Andrew, AU - Dorrian,Jill, AU - Reid,Kathryn, AU - Dawson,Drew, AU - van den Heuvel,Cameron, AU - Baulk,Stuart, Y1 - 2007/08/01/ PY - 2007/02/09/received PY - 2007/05/18/revised PY - 2007/06/20/accepted PY - 2007/12/7/pubmed PY - 2008/3/26/medline PY - 2007/12/7/entrez SP - 573 EP - 7 JF - Journal of psychosomatic research JO - J Psychosom Res VL - 63 IS - 6 N2 - OBJECTIVE: As feelings of alertness are reported to be highly correlated with performance perception, the objective of this study was to determine whether caffeine, a common countermeasure to driver sleepiness, affected a sleepy driver's ability to monitor his or her simulated driving performance. METHODS: Twelve healthy young adults (six males, six females) participated in three counterbalanced, blinded, daytime conditions: control [9 h time in bed (TIB)], 100 mg caffeine (4 h TIB), and placebo (4 h TIB). Driving performance was measured through lane drift on a series of 30-min simulated driving sessions. Subjective sleepiness and perception of driving performance were measured at 5-min intervals during driving sessions via the Karolinska Sleepiness Scale and a corresponding perception scale. RESULTS: Sleep restriction had a significant detrimental effect on driving performance and subjective measures. Caffeine resulted in significant improvements across all measures. Subjective measures were found to be significantly correlated after sleep restriction and prior to caffeine. Correlations between actual and perceived performance were nonsignificant across all conditions. CONCLUSIONS: The strong correlation between subjective measures supports the postulation that sleepiness is used as a cue for performance prediction when sleep restricted. The relationship between perceived and actual performance after fatigue countermeasures remains inconclusive. Further research, addressing limitations, is needed. SN - 0022-3999 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/18061746/Perception_of_simulated_driving_performance_after_sleep_restriction_and_caffeine_ L2 - https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S0022-3999(07)00251-6 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -