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Impact of dental asymmetries on the perception of smile esthetics.
Am J Orthod Dentofacial Orthop. 2007 Dec; 132(6):748-53.AJ

Abstract

INTRODUCTION

The purpose of this study was to evaluate the impact of anterior tooth asymmetries on the perception of smile esthetics.

METHODS

Three pleasant female smiles were digitally altered to simulate several degrees of asymmetry of the gingival margin of a maxillary central incisor, wear of a maxillary canine cusp, and a dental midline shift. Three groups of 50 raters--laypersons, orthodontists, and prosthodontists--evaluated the original and the altered images and used a visual analog scale to score smile esthetics.

RESULTS

The threshold of the orthodontists and the prosthodontists for asymmetry of the gingival margin of a maxillary central incisor was 0.5 mm; the threshold for laypersons, who were less perceptive, was 2.0 mm. Wear of a maxillary canine cusp had no esthetic impact for any group of raters. Midline shifts became perceptible when equal to or greater than 1.0 mm for orthodontists and 3.0 mm for prosthodontists; laypersons saw no alteration.

CONCLUSIONS

Laypersons, orthodontists, and prosthodontists have different perceptions of attractiveness when evaluating gingival margin height of a maxillary central incisor and a dental midline shift. These findings might help dental specialists to consider the patient's esthetic expectations when planning treatment.

Authors+Show Affiliations

University of Brasília, Brasília, DF, Brazil.No affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Comparative Study
Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

18068592

Citation

Pinho, Sérgio, et al. "Impact of Dental Asymmetries On the Perception of Smile Esthetics." American Journal of Orthodontics and Dentofacial Orthopedics : Official Publication of the American Association of Orthodontists, Its Constituent Societies, and the American Board of Orthodontics, vol. 132, no. 6, 2007, pp. 748-53.
Pinho S, Ciriaco C, Faber J, et al. Impact of dental asymmetries on the perception of smile esthetics. Am J Orthod Dentofacial Orthop. 2007;132(6):748-53.
Pinho, S., Ciriaco, C., Faber, J., & Lenza, M. A. (2007). Impact of dental asymmetries on the perception of smile esthetics. American Journal of Orthodontics and Dentofacial Orthopedics : Official Publication of the American Association of Orthodontists, Its Constituent Societies, and the American Board of Orthodontics, 132(6), 748-53.
Pinho S, et al. Impact of Dental Asymmetries On the Perception of Smile Esthetics. Am J Orthod Dentofacial Orthop. 2007;132(6):748-53. PubMed PMID: 18068592.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Impact of dental asymmetries on the perception of smile esthetics. AU - Pinho,Sérgio, AU - Ciriaco,Carolina, AU - Faber,Jorge, AU - Lenza,Marcos A, PY - 2005/09/12/received PY - 2006/01/04/revised PY - 2006/01/04/accepted PY - 2007/12/11/pubmed PY - 2008/1/9/medline PY - 2007/12/11/entrez SP - 748 EP - 53 JF - American journal of orthodontics and dentofacial orthopedics : official publication of the American Association of Orthodontists, its constituent societies, and the American Board of Orthodontics JO - Am J Orthod Dentofacial Orthop VL - 132 IS - 6 N2 - INTRODUCTION: The purpose of this study was to evaluate the impact of anterior tooth asymmetries on the perception of smile esthetics. METHODS: Three pleasant female smiles were digitally altered to simulate several degrees of asymmetry of the gingival margin of a maxillary central incisor, wear of a maxillary canine cusp, and a dental midline shift. Three groups of 50 raters--laypersons, orthodontists, and prosthodontists--evaluated the original and the altered images and used a visual analog scale to score smile esthetics. RESULTS: The threshold of the orthodontists and the prosthodontists for asymmetry of the gingival margin of a maxillary central incisor was 0.5 mm; the threshold for laypersons, who were less perceptive, was 2.0 mm. Wear of a maxillary canine cusp had no esthetic impact for any group of raters. Midline shifts became perceptible when equal to or greater than 1.0 mm for orthodontists and 3.0 mm for prosthodontists; laypersons saw no alteration. CONCLUSIONS: Laypersons, orthodontists, and prosthodontists have different perceptions of attractiveness when evaluating gingival margin height of a maxillary central incisor and a dental midline shift. These findings might help dental specialists to consider the patient's esthetic expectations when planning treatment. SN - 1097-6752 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/18068592/Impact_of_dental_asymmetries_on_the_perception_of_smile_esthetics_ L2 - https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S0889-5406(07)00858-X DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -