Tags

Type your tag names separated by a space and hit enter

The perception of mirror-reflected objects.
Perception. 1991; 20(5):567-84.P

Abstract

In what ways and under what conditions does an object appear to differ from its enantiomorph (its mirror reflection)? This 'mirror question' or its popular counterpart, "Why does a mirror reverse left and right but not up and down?" is frequently encountered, but an acceptable answer is not to be found in the literature. The question is approached as an experimental problem in visual psychophysics. A mirror optically reverses the axis perpendicular to its surface. What are the perceptual consequences of this stimulus transformation? This question is examined in four experiments by using stimuli of varying complexity and familiarity. Apparent reversals are demonstrated along right-left, front-back, top-bottom, and oblique axes, depending on the perceived asymmetries of the stimulus object. Perceived asymmetry is shown to depend both on structural asymmetries and on canonical axes and orientations defined by social convention. It is concluded that an object appears to differ from its enantiomorph by an apparent reversal along the axis of least perceived asymmetry. Implications for perceptual frames of reference and for the perception of symmetry are discussed.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Psychology, University of Arizona, Tucson 85721.No affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

1806901

Citation

Ittelson, W H., et al. "The Perception of Mirror-reflected Objects." Perception, vol. 20, no. 5, 1991, pp. 567-84.
Ittelson WH, Mowafy L, Magid D. The perception of mirror-reflected objects. Perception. 1991;20(5):567-84.
Ittelson, W. H., Mowafy, L., & Magid, D. (1991). The perception of mirror-reflected objects. Perception, 20(5), 567-84.
Ittelson WH, Mowafy L, Magid D. The Perception of Mirror-reflected Objects. Perception. 1991;20(5):567-84. PubMed PMID: 1806901.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - The perception of mirror-reflected objects. AU - Ittelson,W H, AU - Mowafy,L, AU - Magid,D, PY - 1991/1/1/pubmed PY - 1991/1/1/medline PY - 1991/1/1/entrez SP - 567 EP - 84 JF - Perception JO - Perception VL - 20 IS - 5 N2 - In what ways and under what conditions does an object appear to differ from its enantiomorph (its mirror reflection)? This 'mirror question' or its popular counterpart, "Why does a mirror reverse left and right but not up and down?" is frequently encountered, but an acceptable answer is not to be found in the literature. The question is approached as an experimental problem in visual psychophysics. A mirror optically reverses the axis perpendicular to its surface. What are the perceptual consequences of this stimulus transformation? This question is examined in four experiments by using stimuli of varying complexity and familiarity. Apparent reversals are demonstrated along right-left, front-back, top-bottom, and oblique axes, depending on the perceived asymmetries of the stimulus object. Perceived asymmetry is shown to depend both on structural asymmetries and on canonical axes and orientations defined by social convention. It is concluded that an object appears to differ from its enantiomorph by an apparent reversal along the axis of least perceived asymmetry. Implications for perceptual frames of reference and for the perception of symmetry are discussed. SN - 0301-0066 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/1806901/The_perception_of_mirror_reflected_objects_ L2 - http://journals.sagepub.com/doi/full/10.1068/p200567?url_ver=Z39.88-2003&rfr_id=ori:rid:crossref.org&rfr_dat=cr_pub=pubmed DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -