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Psychological comorbidity and complexity of gastrointestinal symptoms in clinically diagnosed irritable bowel syndrome patients.
J Gastroenterol Hepatol. 2008 Jul; 23(7 Pt 1):1137-43.JG

Abstract

BACKGROUND AND AIM

The prevalence of psychological disorders is high in patients with irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) but their role in symptom reporting is uncertain. It is thus interesting whether the number of functional gastrointestinal disorders (FGID) determines the load of psychological comorbidity. The Rome III criteria have not been used to evaluate such a relationship as yet. Moreover, not many studies have examined the sensitivity of the Rome III criteria in detecting IBS. Our aims were therefore: (i) to determine whether those IBS participants with more FGID had a tendency to greater psychological comorbidity than those with fewer FGID; and (ii) to assess the performance of the Rome III criteria in detecting IBS versus the diagnosis of the gastroenterologist.

METHODS

A cross-sectional survey of 32 consecutive outpatients with clinically diagnosed IBS was performed. The Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale (HADS), the Short Form 12 Health Survey (SF-12), and the Rome III criteria questionnaire (BDQ-6) were administered. Multiple linear regression was conducted to detect associations among FGID, anxiety, depression and quality of life.

RESULTS

Overall, 50% of participants were anxious and 12% were depressed. Forty-four percent of participants had >two FGID; however, the number of FGID did not correlate with scores for anxiety, depression or quality of life. Amazingly, only 50% (CI: 33-67) of participants clinically diagnosed with IBS met Rome III criteria for IBS.

CONCLUSION

Contrary to our expectations, a greater load of FGID did not correlate with a greater load of psychological comorbidity. Surprisingly, the Rome III criteria detected only 50% of clinical cases of IBS.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Discipline of General Practice and School of Psychology, University of Adelaide, Adelaide, South Australia, Australia. antonina.mikockawalus@adelaide.edu.auNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Validation Study

Language

eng

PubMed ID

18070012

Citation

Mikocka-Walus, Antonina, et al. "Psychological Comorbidity and Complexity of Gastrointestinal Symptoms in Clinically Diagnosed Irritable Bowel Syndrome Patients." Journal of Gastroenterology and Hepatology, vol. 23, no. 7 Pt 1, 2008, pp. 1137-43.
Mikocka-Walus A, Turnbull D, Moulding N, et al. Psychological comorbidity and complexity of gastrointestinal symptoms in clinically diagnosed irritable bowel syndrome patients. J Gastroenterol Hepatol. 2008;23(7 Pt 1):1137-43.
Mikocka-Walus, A., Turnbull, D., Moulding, N., Wilson, I., Andrews, J. M., & Holtmann, G. (2008). Psychological comorbidity and complexity of gastrointestinal symptoms in clinically diagnosed irritable bowel syndrome patients. Journal of Gastroenterology and Hepatology, 23(7 Pt 1), 1137-43.
Mikocka-Walus A, et al. Psychological Comorbidity and Complexity of Gastrointestinal Symptoms in Clinically Diagnosed Irritable Bowel Syndrome Patients. J Gastroenterol Hepatol. 2008;23(7 Pt 1):1137-43. PubMed PMID: 18070012.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Psychological comorbidity and complexity of gastrointestinal symptoms in clinically diagnosed irritable bowel syndrome patients. AU - Mikocka-Walus,Antonina, AU - Turnbull,Deborah, AU - Moulding,Nicole, AU - Wilson,Ian, AU - Andrews,Jane M, AU - Holtmann,Gerald, Y1 - 2007/12/07/ PY - 2007/12/12/pubmed PY - 2008/10/31/medline PY - 2007/12/12/entrez SP - 1137 EP - 43 JF - Journal of gastroenterology and hepatology JO - J Gastroenterol Hepatol VL - 23 IS - 7 Pt 1 N2 - BACKGROUND AND AIM: The prevalence of psychological disorders is high in patients with irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) but their role in symptom reporting is uncertain. It is thus interesting whether the number of functional gastrointestinal disorders (FGID) determines the load of psychological comorbidity. The Rome III criteria have not been used to evaluate such a relationship as yet. Moreover, not many studies have examined the sensitivity of the Rome III criteria in detecting IBS. Our aims were therefore: (i) to determine whether those IBS participants with more FGID had a tendency to greater psychological comorbidity than those with fewer FGID; and (ii) to assess the performance of the Rome III criteria in detecting IBS versus the diagnosis of the gastroenterologist. METHODS: A cross-sectional survey of 32 consecutive outpatients with clinically diagnosed IBS was performed. The Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale (HADS), the Short Form 12 Health Survey (SF-12), and the Rome III criteria questionnaire (BDQ-6) were administered. Multiple linear regression was conducted to detect associations among FGID, anxiety, depression and quality of life. RESULTS: Overall, 50% of participants were anxious and 12% were depressed. Forty-four percent of participants had >two FGID; however, the number of FGID did not correlate with scores for anxiety, depression or quality of life. Amazingly, only 50% (CI: 33-67) of participants clinically diagnosed with IBS met Rome III criteria for IBS. CONCLUSION: Contrary to our expectations, a greater load of FGID did not correlate with a greater load of psychological comorbidity. Surprisingly, the Rome III criteria detected only 50% of clinical cases of IBS. SN - 1440-1746 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/18070012/Psychological_comorbidity_and_complexity_of_gastrointestinal_symptoms_in_clinically_diagnosed_irritable_bowel_syndrome_patients_ L2 - https://doi.org/10.1111/j.1440-1746.2007.05245.x DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -