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Long-term effect of magnesium consumption on the risk of symptomatic gallstone disease among men.

Abstract

BACKGROUND

Magnesium deficiency can cause dyslipidemia and insulin hypersecretion, which may facilitate gallstone formation. However, the effect of long-term consumption of magnesium on the risk of gallstone disease is unknown.

METHODS

We prospectively studied magnesium consumption and risk of gallstone disease in a cohort of 42,705 U.S. men from 1986 to 2002. Magnesium consumption was assessed using a validated semiquantitative food frequency questionnaire. Newly diagnosed gallstone disease was ascertained biennially.

RESULTS

We documented 2,195 incident cases of symptomatic gallstones during 560,810 person-years of follow-up. The age-adjusted relative risks (RRs) for men with total magnesium intake and dietary magnesium, when the highest and lowest quintiles were compared, were 0.67 (95% confidence interval [CI] 0.59-0.77, P for trend <0.0001) and 0.67 (CI 0.59-0.76, P for trend <0.0001), respectively. After adjusting for multiple potential confounding variables, when extreme quintiles were compared, the multivariate RR of total magnesium intake (RR 0.72, CI 0.61-0.86, P for trend = 0.006) and dietary magnesium (RR 0.68, CI 0.57-0.82, P for trend = 0.0006) remained significant with a dose-response relationship.

CONCLUSIONS

Our findings suggest a protective role of magnesium consumption in the prevention of symptomatic gallstone disease among men.

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  • Authors+Show Affiliations

    ,

    Division of Digestive Diseases and Nutrition, University of Kentucky Medical Center, Lexington, KY 40536-0298, USA.

    , ,

    Source

    MeSH

    Gallstones
    Humans
    Magnesium
    Male
    Middle Aged
    Prospective Studies
    Risk Factors
    Time Factors

    Pub Type(s)

    Journal Article
    Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural

    Language

    eng

    PubMed ID

    18076730

    Citation

    Tsai, Chung-Jyi, et al. "Long-term Effect of Magnesium Consumption On the Risk of Symptomatic Gallstone Disease Among Men." The American Journal of Gastroenterology, vol. 103, no. 2, 2008, pp. 375-82.
    Tsai CJ, Leitzmann MF, Willett WC, et al. Long-term effect of magnesium consumption on the risk of symptomatic gallstone disease among men. Am J Gastroenterol. 2008;103(2):375-82.
    Tsai, C. J., Leitzmann, M. F., Willett, W. C., & Giovannucci, E. L. (2008). Long-term effect of magnesium consumption on the risk of symptomatic gallstone disease among men. The American Journal of Gastroenterology, 103(2), pp. 375-82.
    Tsai CJ, et al. Long-term Effect of Magnesium Consumption On the Risk of Symptomatic Gallstone Disease Among Men. Am J Gastroenterol. 2008;103(2):375-82. PubMed PMID: 18076730.
    * Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
    TY - JOUR T1 - Long-term effect of magnesium consumption on the risk of symptomatic gallstone disease among men. AU - Tsai,Chung-Jyi, AU - Leitzmann,Michael F, AU - Willett,Walter C, AU - Giovannucci,Edward L, Y1 - 2007/12/12/ PY - 2007/12/14/pubmed PY - 2008/4/29/medline PY - 2007/12/14/entrez SP - 375 EP - 82 JF - The American journal of gastroenterology JO - Am. J. Gastroenterol. VL - 103 IS - 2 N2 - BACKGROUND: Magnesium deficiency can cause dyslipidemia and insulin hypersecretion, which may facilitate gallstone formation. However, the effect of long-term consumption of magnesium on the risk of gallstone disease is unknown. METHODS: We prospectively studied magnesium consumption and risk of gallstone disease in a cohort of 42,705 U.S. men from 1986 to 2002. Magnesium consumption was assessed using a validated semiquantitative food frequency questionnaire. Newly diagnosed gallstone disease was ascertained biennially. RESULTS: We documented 2,195 incident cases of symptomatic gallstones during 560,810 person-years of follow-up. The age-adjusted relative risks (RRs) for men with total magnesium intake and dietary magnesium, when the highest and lowest quintiles were compared, were 0.67 (95% confidence interval [CI] 0.59-0.77, P for trend <0.0001) and 0.67 (CI 0.59-0.76, P for trend <0.0001), respectively. After adjusting for multiple potential confounding variables, when extreme quintiles were compared, the multivariate RR of total magnesium intake (RR 0.72, CI 0.61-0.86, P for trend = 0.006) and dietary magnesium (RR 0.68, CI 0.57-0.82, P for trend = 0.0006) remained significant with a dose-response relationship. CONCLUSIONS: Our findings suggest a protective role of magnesium consumption in the prevention of symptomatic gallstone disease among men. SN - 0002-9270 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/18076730/Long_term_effect_of_magnesium_consumption_on_the_risk_of_symptomatic_gallstone_disease_among_men_ L2 - http://Insights.ovid.com/pubmed?pmid=18076730 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -