Tags

Type your tag names separated by a space and hit enter

Long-term effect of magnesium consumption on the risk of symptomatic gallstone disease among men.
Am J Gastroenterol 2008; 103(2):375-82AJ

Abstract

BACKGROUND

Magnesium deficiency can cause dyslipidemia and insulin hypersecretion, which may facilitate gallstone formation. However, the effect of long-term consumption of magnesium on the risk of gallstone disease is unknown.

METHODS

We prospectively studied magnesium consumption and risk of gallstone disease in a cohort of 42,705 U.S. men from 1986 to 2002. Magnesium consumption was assessed using a validated semiquantitative food frequency questionnaire. Newly diagnosed gallstone disease was ascertained biennially.

RESULTS

We documented 2,195 incident cases of symptomatic gallstones during 560,810 person-years of follow-up. The age-adjusted relative risks (RRs) for men with total magnesium intake and dietary magnesium, when the highest and lowest quintiles were compared, were 0.67 (95% confidence interval [CI] 0.59-0.77, P for trend <0.0001) and 0.67 (CI 0.59-0.76, P for trend <0.0001), respectively. After adjusting for multiple potential confounding variables, when extreme quintiles were compared, the multivariate RR of total magnesium intake (RR 0.72, CI 0.61-0.86, P for trend = 0.006) and dietary magnesium (RR 0.68, CI 0.57-0.82, P for trend = 0.0006) remained significant with a dose-response relationship.

CONCLUSIONS

Our findings suggest a protective role of magnesium consumption in the prevention of symptomatic gallstone disease among men.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Division of Digestive Diseases and Nutrition, University of Kentucky Medical Center, Lexington, KY 40536-0298, USA.No affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural

Language

eng

PubMed ID

18076730

Citation

Tsai, Chung-Jyi, et al. "Long-term Effect of Magnesium Consumption On the Risk of Symptomatic Gallstone Disease Among Men." The American Journal of Gastroenterology, vol. 103, no. 2, 2008, pp. 375-82.
Tsai CJ, Leitzmann MF, Willett WC, et al. Long-term effect of magnesium consumption on the risk of symptomatic gallstone disease among men. Am J Gastroenterol. 2008;103(2):375-82.
Tsai, C. J., Leitzmann, M. F., Willett, W. C., & Giovannucci, E. L. (2008). Long-term effect of magnesium consumption on the risk of symptomatic gallstone disease among men. The American Journal of Gastroenterology, 103(2), pp. 375-82.
Tsai CJ, et al. Long-term Effect of Magnesium Consumption On the Risk of Symptomatic Gallstone Disease Among Men. Am J Gastroenterol. 2008;103(2):375-82. PubMed PMID: 18076730.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Long-term effect of magnesium consumption on the risk of symptomatic gallstone disease among men. AU - Tsai,Chung-Jyi, AU - Leitzmann,Michael F, AU - Willett,Walter C, AU - Giovannucci,Edward L, Y1 - 2007/12/12/ PY - 2007/12/14/pubmed PY - 2008/4/29/medline PY - 2007/12/14/entrez SP - 375 EP - 82 JF - The American journal of gastroenterology JO - Am. J. Gastroenterol. VL - 103 IS - 2 N2 - BACKGROUND: Magnesium deficiency can cause dyslipidemia and insulin hypersecretion, which may facilitate gallstone formation. However, the effect of long-term consumption of magnesium on the risk of gallstone disease is unknown. METHODS: We prospectively studied magnesium consumption and risk of gallstone disease in a cohort of 42,705 U.S. men from 1986 to 2002. Magnesium consumption was assessed using a validated semiquantitative food frequency questionnaire. Newly diagnosed gallstone disease was ascertained biennially. RESULTS: We documented 2,195 incident cases of symptomatic gallstones during 560,810 person-years of follow-up. The age-adjusted relative risks (RRs) for men with total magnesium intake and dietary magnesium, when the highest and lowest quintiles were compared, were 0.67 (95% confidence interval [CI] 0.59-0.77, P for trend <0.0001) and 0.67 (CI 0.59-0.76, P for trend <0.0001), respectively. After adjusting for multiple potential confounding variables, when extreme quintiles were compared, the multivariate RR of total magnesium intake (RR 0.72, CI 0.61-0.86, P for trend = 0.006) and dietary magnesium (RR 0.68, CI 0.57-0.82, P for trend = 0.0006) remained significant with a dose-response relationship. CONCLUSIONS: Our findings suggest a protective role of magnesium consumption in the prevention of symptomatic gallstone disease among men. SN - 0002-9270 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/18076730/Long_term_effect_of_magnesium_consumption_on_the_risk_of_symptomatic_gallstone_disease_among_men_ L2 - http://Insights.ovid.com/pubmed?pmid=18076730 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -