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Hirsutism.
Int J Clin Pract. 2008 Mar; 62(3):433-43.IJ

Abstract

Hirsutism is defined as the excessive growth of terminal hair on the face and body of a female in a typical male pattern distribution. Hirsutism is a common clinical problem in women and the treatment depends on the cause of hirsutism. Untreated hirsutism can be associated with considerable loss of self-esteem and psychological morbidity. Hyperandrogenemia is the key trigger for excess hair growth. Polycystic ovary syndrome and idiopathic hirsutism are the most common cause of hirsutism. As with all medical problems, investigation begins with a careful history, examination and then investigation directed at the possible cause. A raised serum testosterone level of > 150 ng/dl (5.2 nmol/l) should prompt further investigations to exclude an underlying androgen-secreting tumour. The treatment of hirsutism is most effective using combination therapy, including lifestyle therapies, androgen suppression, peripheral androgen blockage and cosmetic treatments. Women should be warned not to expect improvement or at least 3-6 months after therapy is begun and lifelong therapy may be needed to prevent recurrence. The current review discusses definition, pathogenesis, differential diagnosis, diagnostic strategies, management, guidelines and the authors' recommendations about hirsutism.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Internal Medicine, Tehran University of Medical Sciences, Sina Hospital, Tehran, Iran. mofid@tums.ac.irNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Review

Language

eng

PubMed ID

18081798

Citation

Mofid, A, et al. "Hirsutism." International Journal of Clinical Practice, vol. 62, no. 3, 2008, pp. 433-43.
Mofid A, Seyyed Alinaghi SA, Zandieh S, et al. Hirsutism. Int J Clin Pract. 2008;62(3):433-43.
Mofid, A., Seyyed Alinaghi, S. A., Zandieh, S., & Yazdani, T. (2008). Hirsutism. International Journal of Clinical Practice, 62(3), 433-43.
Mofid A, et al. Hirsutism. Int J Clin Pract. 2008;62(3):433-43. PubMed PMID: 18081798.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Hirsutism. AU - Mofid,A, AU - Seyyed Alinaghi,S A, AU - Zandieh,S, AU - Yazdani,T, Y1 - 2007/12/11/ PY - 2007/12/18/pubmed PY - 2008/10/31/medline PY - 2007/12/18/entrez SP - 433 EP - 43 JF - International journal of clinical practice JO - Int J Clin Pract VL - 62 IS - 3 N2 - Hirsutism is defined as the excessive growth of terminal hair on the face and body of a female in a typical male pattern distribution. Hirsutism is a common clinical problem in women and the treatment depends on the cause of hirsutism. Untreated hirsutism can be associated with considerable loss of self-esteem and psychological morbidity. Hyperandrogenemia is the key trigger for excess hair growth. Polycystic ovary syndrome and idiopathic hirsutism are the most common cause of hirsutism. As with all medical problems, investigation begins with a careful history, examination and then investigation directed at the possible cause. A raised serum testosterone level of > 150 ng/dl (5.2 nmol/l) should prompt further investigations to exclude an underlying androgen-secreting tumour. The treatment of hirsutism is most effective using combination therapy, including lifestyle therapies, androgen suppression, peripheral androgen blockage and cosmetic treatments. Women should be warned not to expect improvement or at least 3-6 months after therapy is begun and lifelong therapy may be needed to prevent recurrence. The current review discusses definition, pathogenesis, differential diagnosis, diagnostic strategies, management, guidelines and the authors' recommendations about hirsutism. SN - 1368-5031 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/18081798/Hirsutism_ DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -