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Linking dating violence, peer violence, and suicidal behaviors among high-risk youth.
Am J Prev Med. 2008 Jan; 34(1):30-8.AJ

Abstract

BACKGROUND

Gaps in the understanding of how different types of violent behavior are linked have limited the ability to design violence prevention efforts that can address multiple types of violence. The objective of this study was to quantify the associations among suicide attempts, and date and peer violence victimization and perpetration and to determine any differences in these associations by gender.

METHODS

Analyses, computed in 2006 and 2007, used data from the Youth Violence Survey conducted in 2004. This survey was administered to over 80% of public school students in grades 7, 9, 11, and 12 (N=4131) in a high-risk, urban school district. Analyses were restricted to adolescents who dated in the past year (n=2888). Five forms of violent behaviors (i.e., dating violence perpetration, dating violence victimization, peer violence perpetration, peer violence victimization, and suicide attempts) were examined.

RESULTS

Peer violence victimization was the most common type of violence reported (33.0%), followed by date violence victimization (30.7%), peer violence perpetration (29.9%), date violence perpetration (24.8%), and suicide attempts (11.2%). Among all students, 9.8% reported involvement in at least four of the five violent behaviors examined. All five forms of violent behaviors were associated. The highest ORs were observed for victimization and perpetration within either the dating or peer context. However, associations across contexts were also observed.

CONCLUSIONS

There is a substantial overlap among different forms of violent behavior, suggesting that additional research is needed to better understand the factors that contribute to involvement in multiple forms of violence.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Atlanta, Georgia, USA. MSwahn@gsu.eduNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

18083448

Citation

Swahn, Monica H., et al. "Linking Dating Violence, Peer Violence, and Suicidal Behaviors Among High-risk Youth." American Journal of Preventive Medicine, vol. 34, no. 1, 2008, pp. 30-8.
Swahn MH, Simon TR, Hertz MF, et al. Linking dating violence, peer violence, and suicidal behaviors among high-risk youth. Am J Prev Med. 2008;34(1):30-8.
Swahn, M. H., Simon, T. R., Hertz, M. F., Arias, I., Bossarte, R. M., Ross, J. G., Gross, L. A., Iachan, R., & Hamburger, M. E. (2008). Linking dating violence, peer violence, and suicidal behaviors among high-risk youth. American Journal of Preventive Medicine, 34(1), 30-8.
Swahn MH, et al. Linking Dating Violence, Peer Violence, and Suicidal Behaviors Among High-risk Youth. Am J Prev Med. 2008;34(1):30-8. PubMed PMID: 18083448.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Linking dating violence, peer violence, and suicidal behaviors among high-risk youth. AU - Swahn,Monica H, AU - Simon,Thomas R, AU - Hertz,Marci F, AU - Arias,Ileana, AU - Bossarte,Robert M, AU - Ross,James G, AU - Gross,Lori A, AU - Iachan,Ronaldo, AU - Hamburger,Merle E, PY - 2006/08/15/received PY - 2007/07/23/revised PY - 2007/09/11/accepted PY - 2007/12/18/pubmed PY - 2008/2/27/medline PY - 2007/12/18/entrez SP - 30 EP - 8 JF - American journal of preventive medicine JO - Am J Prev Med VL - 34 IS - 1 N2 - BACKGROUND: Gaps in the understanding of how different types of violent behavior are linked have limited the ability to design violence prevention efforts that can address multiple types of violence. The objective of this study was to quantify the associations among suicide attempts, and date and peer violence victimization and perpetration and to determine any differences in these associations by gender. METHODS: Analyses, computed in 2006 and 2007, used data from the Youth Violence Survey conducted in 2004. This survey was administered to over 80% of public school students in grades 7, 9, 11, and 12 (N=4131) in a high-risk, urban school district. Analyses were restricted to adolescents who dated in the past year (n=2888). Five forms of violent behaviors (i.e., dating violence perpetration, dating violence victimization, peer violence perpetration, peer violence victimization, and suicide attempts) were examined. RESULTS: Peer violence victimization was the most common type of violence reported (33.0%), followed by date violence victimization (30.7%), peer violence perpetration (29.9%), date violence perpetration (24.8%), and suicide attempts (11.2%). Among all students, 9.8% reported involvement in at least four of the five violent behaviors examined. All five forms of violent behaviors were associated. The highest ORs were observed for victimization and perpetration within either the dating or peer context. However, associations across contexts were also observed. CONCLUSIONS: There is a substantial overlap among different forms of violent behavior, suggesting that additional research is needed to better understand the factors that contribute to involvement in multiple forms of violence. SN - 0749-3797 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/18083448/Linking_dating_violence_peer_violence_and_suicidal_behaviors_among_high_risk_youth_ DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -