Tags

Type your tag names separated by a space and hit enter

Age-related differences in auditory evoked responses during rapid perceptual learning.
Clin Neurophysiol. 2008 Feb; 119(2):356-66.CN

Abstract

OBJECTIVE

Young and older adults can learn to rapidly discriminate between elementary visual and auditory features. While growing evidence supports the notion that such behavioral improvement is paralleled by neuroplastic changes in corresponding sensory areas during adulthood, studies have not examined practice-related improvement in older adults and the corresponding changes in neural activity.

METHODS

We used event-related potentials (ERPs) to investigate the effects of age on rapid learning-related changes in listeners' ability to identify two phonetically different vowels presented simultaneously.

RESULTS

During the first hour of testing, young and older listeners showed comparable behavioral improvement in identifying both vowels. In young adults, learning was paralleled by enhanced amplitudes of early (130 ms) and late (320 ms) ERP waves over the right temporal lobe, as well as an increased negative wave over the midline parietal region, peaking at about 400 ms after sound onset. The practice-related changes over the right temporal lobe were not present in older adults whereas the learning effect observed over the parietal region was present in both young and older adults. In older adults, behavioral improvement was also associated with reduced N1 amplitude recorded at inferior and posterior temporal/occipital scalp sites while no such changes were observed in young adults.

CONCLUSIONS

Age-related differences in neural activity during learning suggest that neural networks supporting behavioral improvements in speech segregation and identification change during the course of aging.

SIGNIFICANCE

This research highlights the role of practice on concurrent sound perception and may facilitate the development of training programs that may help older listeners to parse the auditory scene into component sound sources.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Rotman Research Institute, Baycrest Centre for Geriatric Care, Department of Psychology, University of Toronto, Ontario, Canada. calain@rotman-baycrest.on.caNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

18083619

Citation

Alain, Claude, and Joel S. Snyder. "Age-related Differences in Auditory Evoked Responses During Rapid Perceptual Learning." Clinical Neurophysiology : Official Journal of the International Federation of Clinical Neurophysiology, vol. 119, no. 2, 2008, pp. 356-66.
Alain C, Snyder JS. Age-related differences in auditory evoked responses during rapid perceptual learning. Clin Neurophysiol. 2008;119(2):356-66.
Alain, C., & Snyder, J. S. (2008). Age-related differences in auditory evoked responses during rapid perceptual learning. Clinical Neurophysiology : Official Journal of the International Federation of Clinical Neurophysiology, 119(2), 356-66.
Alain C, Snyder JS. Age-related Differences in Auditory Evoked Responses During Rapid Perceptual Learning. Clin Neurophysiol. 2008;119(2):356-66. PubMed PMID: 18083619.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Age-related differences in auditory evoked responses during rapid perceptual learning. AU - Alain,Claude, AU - Snyder,Joel S, PY - 2007/08/03/received PY - 2007/09/17/revised PY - 2007/10/31/accepted PY - 2007/12/18/pubmed PY - 2008/4/12/medline PY - 2007/12/18/entrez SP - 356 EP - 66 JF - Clinical neurophysiology : official journal of the International Federation of Clinical Neurophysiology JO - Clin Neurophysiol VL - 119 IS - 2 N2 - OBJECTIVE: Young and older adults can learn to rapidly discriminate between elementary visual and auditory features. While growing evidence supports the notion that such behavioral improvement is paralleled by neuroplastic changes in corresponding sensory areas during adulthood, studies have not examined practice-related improvement in older adults and the corresponding changes in neural activity. METHODS: We used event-related potentials (ERPs) to investigate the effects of age on rapid learning-related changes in listeners' ability to identify two phonetically different vowels presented simultaneously. RESULTS: During the first hour of testing, young and older listeners showed comparable behavioral improvement in identifying both vowels. In young adults, learning was paralleled by enhanced amplitudes of early (130 ms) and late (320 ms) ERP waves over the right temporal lobe, as well as an increased negative wave over the midline parietal region, peaking at about 400 ms after sound onset. The practice-related changes over the right temporal lobe were not present in older adults whereas the learning effect observed over the parietal region was present in both young and older adults. In older adults, behavioral improvement was also associated with reduced N1 amplitude recorded at inferior and posterior temporal/occipital scalp sites while no such changes were observed in young adults. CONCLUSIONS: Age-related differences in neural activity during learning suggest that neural networks supporting behavioral improvements in speech segregation and identification change during the course of aging. SIGNIFICANCE: This research highlights the role of practice on concurrent sound perception and may facilitate the development of training programs that may help older listeners to parse the auditory scene into component sound sources. SN - 1388-2457 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/18083619/Age_related_differences_in_auditory_evoked_responses_during_rapid_perceptual_learning_ L2 - https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S1388-2457(07)00642-6 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -