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Executive functions deficit in mild cognitive impairment.
Cogn Behav Neurol 2007; 20(4):219-24CB

Abstract

OBJECTIVE

To investigate whether patients diagnosed with amnestic mild cognitive impairment (MCI) have also impairment in attention/executive functions, and therefore to clarify whether all subcomponents of executive control are equally affected in MCI.

BACKGROUND

MCI refers to the transitional state between normal aging and dementia. Amnestic MCI is characterized by impaired episodic memory, although subtle impairment of executive functions has been noted on neuropsychologic tests.

METHODS

We investigated 20 MCI patients and 20 normal controls using episodic memory, attention/executive functions, language, and praxis tests.

RESULTS

MCI patients had significantly lower scores on all measures of the Free and Cued Selective Reminding Test (P<0.05 to 0.01) than controls. Furthermore, MCI had a greater number of perseverations (P<0.01) on Modified Card Sorting Test and the lowest performance on the Stroop Test (P<0.02).

CONCLUSIONS

Our findings showed impairment in episodic memory performance in MCI as compared with that of controls. In addition, MCI patients had problems with response inhibition, switching, and cognitive flexibility, which encompass various aspects of executive functions. This suggests that MCI may be identified by using a more detailed procedure for the assessment of cognitive decline than the evaluation of memory alone.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Hôpital Henri Mondor, Department of Neurology, University Paris XII, Créteil, France. traykov_l@yahoo.frNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

18091070

Citation

Traykov, Latchezar, et al. "Executive Functions Deficit in Mild Cognitive Impairment." Cognitive and Behavioral Neurology : Official Journal of the Society for Behavioral and Cognitive Neurology, vol. 20, no. 4, 2007, pp. 219-24.
Traykov L, Raoux N, Latour F, et al. Executive functions deficit in mild cognitive impairment. Cogn Behav Neurol. 2007;20(4):219-24.
Traykov, L., Raoux, N., Latour, F., Gallo, L., Hanon, O., Baudic, S., ... Rigaud, A. S. (2007). Executive functions deficit in mild cognitive impairment. Cognitive and Behavioral Neurology : Official Journal of the Society for Behavioral and Cognitive Neurology, 20(4), pp. 219-24.
Traykov L, et al. Executive Functions Deficit in Mild Cognitive Impairment. Cogn Behav Neurol. 2007;20(4):219-24. PubMed PMID: 18091070.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Executive functions deficit in mild cognitive impairment. AU - Traykov,Latchezar, AU - Raoux,Nadine, AU - Latour,Florence, AU - Gallo,Livia, AU - Hanon,Olivier, AU - Baudic,Sophie, AU - Bayle,Catherine, AU - Wenisch,Emilie, AU - Remy,Philippe, AU - Rigaud,Anne-Sophie, PY - 2007/12/20/pubmed PY - 2008/2/22/medline PY - 2007/12/20/entrez SP - 219 EP - 24 JF - Cognitive and behavioral neurology : official journal of the Society for Behavioral and Cognitive Neurology JO - Cogn Behav Neurol VL - 20 IS - 4 N2 - OBJECTIVE: To investigate whether patients diagnosed with amnestic mild cognitive impairment (MCI) have also impairment in attention/executive functions, and therefore to clarify whether all subcomponents of executive control are equally affected in MCI. BACKGROUND: MCI refers to the transitional state between normal aging and dementia. Amnestic MCI is characterized by impaired episodic memory, although subtle impairment of executive functions has been noted on neuropsychologic tests. METHODS: We investigated 20 MCI patients and 20 normal controls using episodic memory, attention/executive functions, language, and praxis tests. RESULTS: MCI patients had significantly lower scores on all measures of the Free and Cued Selective Reminding Test (P<0.05 to 0.01) than controls. Furthermore, MCI had a greater number of perseverations (P<0.01) on Modified Card Sorting Test and the lowest performance on the Stroop Test (P<0.02). CONCLUSIONS: Our findings showed impairment in episodic memory performance in MCI as compared with that of controls. In addition, MCI patients had problems with response inhibition, switching, and cognitive flexibility, which encompass various aspects of executive functions. This suggests that MCI may be identified by using a more detailed procedure for the assessment of cognitive decline than the evaluation of memory alone. SN - 1543-3641 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/18091070/Executive_functions_deficit_in_mild_cognitive_impairment_ L2 - http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/WNN.0b013e31815e6254 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -