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Diminished cortisol responses to psychosocial stress associated with lifetime adverse events a study among healthy young subjects.
Psychoneuroendocrinology. 2008 Feb; 33(2):227-37.P

Abstract

BACKGROUND

Animal and human studies have found that prior stressful events can result in an altered reactivity in the HPA axis. The aim of the present study was to investigate the role of adverse events in childhood on cortisol reactivity to psychosocial stress in young healthy subjects (n=80).

METHODS

Salivary cortisol levels were measured before, during and after exposure to a psychosocial stress task in healthy men and women with high (n=33) and low (n=47) exposure to adverse childhood events.

RESULTS

A significant blunted cortisol response was found in individuals with a history of adverse events compared to individuals with no adverse life events, with no differences in baseline cortisol levels. This finding appeared to be primarily driven by men. The groups did not differ on any other physiological or subjective stress measure, including heart rate, blood pressure, and subjective tension.

CONCLUSIONS

These findings suggest that, at least in healthy young males, adverse childhood events are associated with changes in HPA-axis functioning. Longitudinal studies are needed to investigate whether the blunted cortisol response is a risk factor in the etiology of psychiatric disorders or rather reflects resiliency with regard to the development of psychopathology.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Clinical, Health and NeuroPsychology, University of Leiden, Wassenaarseweg 52, 2333 AK Leiden, The Netherlands. elzinga@fsw.leidenuniv.nlNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Comparative Study
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

18096322

Citation

Elzinga, Bernet M., et al. "Diminished Cortisol Responses to Psychosocial Stress Associated With Lifetime Adverse Events a Study Among Healthy Young Subjects." Psychoneuroendocrinology, vol. 33, no. 2, 2008, pp. 227-37.
Elzinga BM, Roelofs K, Tollenaar MS, et al. Diminished cortisol responses to psychosocial stress associated with lifetime adverse events a study among healthy young subjects. Psychoneuroendocrinology. 2008;33(2):227-37.
Elzinga, B. M., Roelofs, K., Tollenaar, M. S., Bakvis, P., van Pelt, J., & Spinhoven, P. (2008). Diminished cortisol responses to psychosocial stress associated with lifetime adverse events a study among healthy young subjects. Psychoneuroendocrinology, 33(2), 227-37.
Elzinga BM, et al. Diminished Cortisol Responses to Psychosocial Stress Associated With Lifetime Adverse Events a Study Among Healthy Young Subjects. Psychoneuroendocrinology. 2008;33(2):227-37. PubMed PMID: 18096322.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Diminished cortisol responses to psychosocial stress associated with lifetime adverse events a study among healthy young subjects. AU - Elzinga,Bernet M, AU - Roelofs,Karin, AU - Tollenaar,Marieke S, AU - Bakvis,Patricia, AU - van Pelt,Johannes, AU - Spinhoven,Philip, Y1 - 2007/12/21/ PY - 2006/11/16/received PY - 2007/11/08/revised PY - 2007/11/08/accepted PY - 2007/12/22/pubmed PY - 2008/5/7/medline PY - 2007/12/22/entrez SP - 227 EP - 37 JF - Psychoneuroendocrinology JO - Psychoneuroendocrinology VL - 33 IS - 2 N2 - BACKGROUND: Animal and human studies have found that prior stressful events can result in an altered reactivity in the HPA axis. The aim of the present study was to investigate the role of adverse events in childhood on cortisol reactivity to psychosocial stress in young healthy subjects (n=80). METHODS: Salivary cortisol levels were measured before, during and after exposure to a psychosocial stress task in healthy men and women with high (n=33) and low (n=47) exposure to adverse childhood events. RESULTS: A significant blunted cortisol response was found in individuals with a history of adverse events compared to individuals with no adverse life events, with no differences in baseline cortisol levels. This finding appeared to be primarily driven by men. The groups did not differ on any other physiological or subjective stress measure, including heart rate, blood pressure, and subjective tension. CONCLUSIONS: These findings suggest that, at least in healthy young males, adverse childhood events are associated with changes in HPA-axis functioning. Longitudinal studies are needed to investigate whether the blunted cortisol response is a risk factor in the etiology of psychiatric disorders or rather reflects resiliency with regard to the development of psychopathology. SN - 0306-4530 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/18096322/Diminished_cortisol_responses_to_psychosocial_stress_associated_with_lifetime_adverse_events_a_study_among_healthy_young_subjects_ L2 - https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S0306-4530(07)00252-1 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -